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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I'm going to quit using a press to seat primers and use a hand tool. My Dillon 550 never has seated primers worth a hoot. It takes too much pressure and the primers sometime have a 'dented' appearance. My RCBS Jr. isn't much better. My little Lee hand primer seats primers with far less difficulty than either and doesn't have primers stacked on top of each other.

It'll be a pain on the Dillon but I'm not an ammo factory. I can spend the extra time.
 

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I have never had an issue with my RCBS Jr over 30 years, not an issue with my LnL. That said the Dillon 550 gave me fits for two years so I moved on.
 
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I always hand seat ALL my primers. I use a Bald Eagle primer setter tool for the rifle cases and an RCBS had primer-seater for the handgun primers. I can precisely control the seat pressure with the Bald Eagle but for handgun stuff it's a bit over the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Your experience pretty much mirrors mine.

The Dillon always has been the worst about denting primers.

I'm mainly concerned about working around a tube full of primers. There's quite a bit of explosive power there.
 

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I have a Hornady Lock-n-load press. it's primer insertion system works flawlessly if it's kept clean.

I wear a face shield (heavier than the ones sold these days at Sams Club) when handling primers and reloading - and am always very careful where the primer loading tube is pointed while I'm handling it.

The case is primed at the bottom of the down stroke (as you push the press lever) and you can feel it seat. The priming mechanism is in the right of the opening shot of this video. The tube of primers is inside a second steel tube.

 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The best single stage press I ever used (it wasn't mine) was a Forrster/Bonanza Co-Ax. You had to feed it primers one at a time because it didn't have a primer tube and the thing was about as smooth as using a good hand priming tool.
 

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I’ve been seating primers almost exclusively with my 550b for more than 30 years without incident or mishap. Primers are dented only when there is debris in the pocket that holds the primer.
 

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Have no use for primer tubes at all. The more primers ae handled the more chance of a no fire.
 

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Your experience pretty much mirrors mine.

The Dillon always has been the worst about denting primers.

I'm mainly concerned about working around a tube full of primers. There's quite a bit of explosive power there.
Why? Are you going to hit them with a hammer or something? Seriously, primers in a tube aren't an issue
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Why? Are you going to hit them with a hammer or something? Seriously, primers in a tube aren't an issue
 

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Again, how is that bottom primer going to go off? it won't decide to do it in its own. I have used primer tubes for almost 40 years and have never had any issue. Loose primers in a jar can be detonated - there are web stories about that.
 

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While it's a low risk issue, it can happen - which is why I wear face / eye protection when reloading.

If a primer is somehow not in correct position inside the primer tube, it's possible that the feed could crush the primer - and sometimes violently enough to ignite it. If it goes off in the tube it can set off others resting there.

A clear face shield is easy to wear, really doesn't get in the way and can protect you from serious injury.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Again, how is that bottom primer going to go off? it won't decide to do it in its own. I have used primer tubes for almost 40 years and have never had any issue. Loose primers in a jar can be detonated - there are web stories about that.
And I'm not telling you to quit using primer tubes. All I said was that I'm going to quit using them.
 

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Interesting. Never used them, don't plan on it. I will say that detonating a primer is similar to shooting a kids cap pistol (you remember those right?)...

I've detonated 209's in my inline smoke pole before (with no charge or pill in the breech), they just go 'pop' and that is it and I'd say a 209 has more 'pop' than say a large pistol primer. I much prefer either my RCBS hand priming tool (because it has a tactile feel to the seating operation, or my Bald Eagle when I seat primers for match rifle loads.
 
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