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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I am restoring what I believe is a pre-war era Model 10 that I inherited from my father, who bought it online a few years ago. I would like to ask 2 questions: 1) What year was it made? 2) How do I fix the spring-loaded pin in the side plate that is sticking?

Serial number 4700XX
I believe the side of the barrel says "38 S&W Special CTG". I can double check tonight if necessary for ID.

I've got everything working internally now except the cylinder advancement arm ("hand"? I don't know all the proper terms yet). It appears that a spring loaded pin built into the side plate rides on the angled face of the "hand", which causes the hand to advance the cylinder when the hammer is cocked. This pin will work once, then gets stuck back in the side plate, causing the cylinder to no longer advance the next time you cock it. If I tap the side plate, the pin will pop out and work once before getting stuck again. I've tried lubricating it generously without success. Right now I have the side plate soaking in Hoppes 9 but I'm thinking that may not be the correct solvent to use. Perhaps the spring behind the pin needs to be replaced? It was exposed to heat, so I'm questioning the strength of the springs. I already had to replace a broken mainspring.

Is there a way to remove this pin and spring from the side plate? I haven't been able to find any information on how to disassemble this part.

Thanks!!
 

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Welcome from Florida!

Post some pics of your gun; around here, pics go a long way for folks to see exactly what you mean so you don't get honest mistaken advice because of a lack of clarity.
 

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Welcome to the forum. If you're going to do this level of work yourself, you should first get and study a copy of Jerry Kuhnhausen's book:

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/101636706

There are hand fitted clearances involved in many parts of the S&W action, and they all interact.

By "exposed to heat" do you mean that the revolver has gone through a fire? If so, many of the parts that are tempered and hardened could be damaged.
 

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Sounds like you may be talking about the rebound slide & spring. Hoppes is about as good as any other solvent except maybe Kroil, but you need to remove the slide & make sure there's no dirt or corrosion on the back side of it against the frame or in the spring hole. To remove the slide, compress the spring with a small screwdriver while at the same time lifting it off its pin on the frame, but expect some aggravation in getting back in place; a special tool is made for this purpose, but it can be done with a screwdriver & patience.

Better yet BUY THIS BOOK: https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?bi=0&bx=off&cm_sp=SearchF-_-Advtab1-_-Results&ds=30&recentlyadded=all&sortby=17&sts=t&tn=gun digest book of firearms assembly revolvers

The internet is no substitute for a proper repair manual!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for the link to the book, mrerick. I find these old revolvers fascinating.

Yes, it went through my mother's house fire last year. I have been restoring many firearms that went through the fire and I understand there are risks involved with damaged guns. I am taking safety precautions.

Do you have a list of the parts in a Model 10 that are tempered? I assumed all springs could be affected, but what else are you referring to? Thanks.
 

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Thank you for the link to the book, mrerick. I find these old revolvers fascinating.

Yes, it went through my mother's house fire last year. I have been restoring many firearms that went through the fire and I understand there are risks involved with damaged guns. I am taking safety precautions.

Do you have a list of the parts in a Model 10 that are tempered? I assumed all springs could be affected, but what else are you referring to? Thanks.
The guns cylinder is one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No, the rebound slide and spring isn't the one I'm referring to. Until I get home from work tonight and get pictures of my pistol, here is a diagram to illustrate the part I'm referring to. The model pictured isn't quite the same as what I have, so I circled the area I'm talking about, and drew a green line where the spring loaded pin in question is located. It is retained by the hammer block in the side plate.

SW-Diagram-Schematic.png


Sounds like you may be talking about the rebound slide & spring. Hoppes is about as good as any other solvent except maybe Kroil, but you need to remove the slide & make sure there's no dirt or corrosion on the back side of it against the frame or in the spring hole. To remove the slide, compress the spring with a small screwdriver while at the same time lifting it off its pin on the frame, but expect some aggravation in getting back in place; a special tool is made for this purpose, but it can be done with a screwdriver & patience.

Better yet BUY THIS BOOK: https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?bi=0&bx=off&cm_sp=SearchF-_-Advtab1-_-Results&ds=30&recentlyadded=all&sortby=17&sts=t&tn=gun digest book of firearms assembly revolvers

The internet is no substitute for a proper repair manual!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am having the barrel and cylinder tested for safety. My focus in this post is restoring the inner-workings of the gun. I had hoped to avoid the fire topic because of the many well intentioned warnings I expected to receive, and have received and taken to heart from other forums, books, gunsmiths, knowledgeable folks, etc., but alas... :D Please know that I understand the seriousness of a damaged firearm and I put the safety of myself and others above all else on this restoration.


The guns cylinder is one.
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! First let me congratulate you on your diligence with restoration of your father's gun collection. However, you must be aware that the guns that were fire damaged are no longer collectible even if you can pretty them up to being close to original. For example, your .38 Military & Police Model 1905, 4th Change (not a pre-Model 10, BTW) which was made around 1925 will only be worth around $400 as a shooter if you have it professionally restored. A fire would have to be exceptionally hot to alter the metallurgy enough to degrade the frame, cylinder and barrel steel strength. But, soot gets into the narrowest of crevices and needs to be completely eliminated. You might find a gunshop with a liquid sonic cleaner and have them douse the whole gun until it is squeaky clean. See if that loosens up the hand spring. If not, you will have to remove the blade and clean the crevice with a pick. The blade is press fit and staked and they do break. Replacements of the proper kind (these changed around 1925) are available.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Wiregrassguy, thank you for the extremely helpful and informational reply!! 1925 manufacture date is earlier than I expected! Thank you for the advice on it's value. Luckily, I have no interest in it's monetary value. My dad paid $255 for it about 5 years ago. My only desire is to bring it back to life and plink with it once more. It was a tack driver before, and very pleasant to shoot on the range. I will look into cleaning out the hand spring as suggested.

Thanks again!!
 

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You may be interested to know that my paternal grandfather's 1924 .32 Regulation Police also burned in a sharecropper's cabin in the 1950's and I did a restoration on it for shadowbox display. Although the frame size is smaller than your .38 M&P (K frame), the configuration ... grips and other features...will be similar.

 

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There are some areas within the S&W action where flatness is quite critical. The place where the rebound spring and the cage that encloses it is one of these. The part surfaces are typically polished in these area. Use a gauge to verify flatness and that the frame hasn't warped in this area.

The cylinder, barrel, frame areas and several internal parts are hardened.
 

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Welcome to the forum! Please post some pics to document your progress with use. Good info to share with the other members here. Keep us up to date.:cool:
 

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Welcome aboard from the "GunShine"state of Florida. weiweinp

State of over 2 MILLION 21 THOUSAND Concealed Carry Licenses and counting!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Good news! After soaking the side plate overnight in Hoppes 9 the hand spring is functioning. It will still stick if I manually push the pin in all the way but it is not sticking during normal cocking and de-cocking any longer. Below are pictures of the side plate with the hand spring (pin? detent?) fully extended, then a picture of it stuck in. And the last picture is of the gun in question. I haven't started restoring the bluing yet. Thank you everyone for the Welcomes and the help!


SW1.jpg
SW2.jpg
SW3.jpg
 
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