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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked up a new Shield Plus yesterday- I had the OG Shield and currently carry the Shield 2.0 which I love. When I got home I noticed that my trigger safety (dingus) had a lot of slop in it, and depending on how the gun was oriented, it would extend fully, or do the opposite and retract a couple of millimeters.

Beyond that, I also noticed that with the trigger safety only partially depressed (75% if I had to make a guess) the trigger was able to be fully depressed, and fire. To me, this defeats the entire purpose of a safety blade on the trigger. If the gun can fire with the safety only partially depressed, why even have it on there in the first place? Combine that with the slop in the blade safety and I feel that's a valid concern.

I've included two YouTube videos that I recorded that outline the issues, wondering what you all think. Also - if anyone has a Shield Plus, can you please let me know if your dingus is as sloppy as mine?

I reached out to Smith and Wesson via email last night, along with these videos and they said there was no issue and that everything in the videos was normal - I kind of disagree, so I wanted to run this by the community.

Trigger Safety Slop -

Trigger Safety Bypass -
 

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First off, what you and everybody else seems to call it is a trigger safety. It is not a trigger safety, and I wish it would be called exactly what it really is. It's a sear block release. Without [it] being depressed fully the gun can't fire, especially when dropped. (That's the safety feature)
The entire purpose for it, is to keep the sear from engaging unless the trigger is pulled. It is nearly impossible to pull the trigger back with your finger without engaging the sear release. Watching your videos it appears that you're trying to cause a malfunction, which you haven't. It looks to be working correctly, and you should have no worries using it as built.
 

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First off, what you and everybody else seems to call it is a trigger safety. It is not a trigger safety, and I wish it would be called exactly what it really is. It's a sear block release. Without [it] being depressed fully the gun can't fire, especially when dropped. (That's the safety feature)
...
Correct. Its purpose is as a drop safety. It is not a negligent discharge safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First off, what you and everybody else seems to call it is a trigger safety. It is not a trigger safety, and I wish it would be called exactly what it really is. It's a sear block release. Without [it] being depressed fully the gun can't fire, especially when dropped. (That's the safety feature)
The entire purpose for it, is to keep the sear from engaging unless the trigger is pulled. It is nearly impossible to pull the trigger back with your finger without engaging the sear release. Watching your videos it appears that you're trying to cause a malfunction, which you haven't. It looks to be working correctly, and you should have no worries using it as built.
First off - I appreciate the clarification of proper nomenclature, and thank you for taking the time to reply, I definitely appreciate it. Second - it is a trigger safety. It's a safety device, affixed to a trigger. It is also a sear block release. Technical terminology does not have to be absolutely reductive to be communicated accurately from one person to another. Gun manufacturers themselves also refer to them as trigger safeties, as the implication is that it blocks the trigger from depressing unless done so intentionally, which in turn starts the party (sear release, etc...). We call seat belts "seat belts" because the mechanism of action is understood as such within the public consciousness, and we don't need them to be referred to as "impact body decelerators". With contextual clues such as the ones I'd provided in my post, it should be clear that the mechanism of how it functions isn't in question on my part, but rather the efficacy, and whether or not there is a potential flaw in the implementation.

"Watching your videos it appears that you're trying to cause a malfunction, which you haven't."- With the trigger safety not fully depressed, I was able to release the sear and actuate the trigger mechanism. It is not impossible, nor is it difficult, however it was difficult to do while recording one-handed 😂. If you focus on the top rear of the trigger, you can see that I've bypassed the point at which the trigger safety can engage.

That being said, I do have one follow-up question. For a spring-loaded safety device affixed to a trigger - in your opinion, is it OK that on a sparkling new gun, there is enough play/slop in the spring tension, to where the free travel of the safety device is 50% or so?
 

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If in doubt, go back to where you bought it and ask them to either send it to S&W for the repair, or ask them if they have a local gunsmith that can repair it quickly. (My shop does that regularly), or send it to S&W. No matter which you choose it should cost you nothing more than a few weeks without your new pistol.
As for me, I'd live with it.
It's your call no matter which option you choose.

For the record, I own no handguns with one of those damned things attached to the trigger.
 
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First, always treat a safety related mechanism in a firearm as if it can and will fail.

Next, if you suspect a failure in any part of a firearm, get it to a gunsmith that can diagnose it and repair it or forward it to the manufacturer as appropriate. Never use or carry a questionable firearm that is likely to malfunction. Period.

in NRA Basic Handgun Education classes we teach some basic safety rules for good reason. Always follow them. A forum is great for talking about such things, but we don't fix guns here.
 
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First off - I appreciate the clarification of proper nomenclature, and thank you for taking the time to reply, I definitely appreciate it. Second - it is a trigger safety. It's a safety device, affixed to a trigger. It is also a sear block release. Technical terminology does not have to be absolutely reductive to be communicated accurately from one person to another. Gun manufacturers themselves also refer to them as trigger safeties, as the implication is that it blocks the trigger from depressing unless done so intentionally, which in turn starts the party (sear release, etc...). We call seat belts "seat belts" because the mechanism of action is understood as such within the public consciousness, and we don't need them to be referred to as "impact body decelerators". With contextual clues such as the ones I'd provided in my post, it should be clear that the mechanism of how it functions isn't in question on my part, but rather the efficacy, and whether or not there is a potential flaw in the implementation.

"Watching your videos it appears that you're trying to cause a malfunction, which you haven't."- With the trigger safety not fully depressed, I was able to release the sear and actuate the trigger mechanism. It is not impossible, nor is it difficult, however it was difficult to do while recording one-handed 😂. If you focus on the top rear of the trigger, you can see that I've bypassed the point at which the trigger safety can engage.

That being said, I do have one follow-up question. For a spring-loaded safety device affixed to a trigger - in your opinion, is it OK that on a sparkling new gun, there is enough play/slop in the spring tension, to where the free travel of the safety device is 50% or so?
BryanMT,
I'm with you on this one. There is too much play in that "trigger safety". I just picked up my Shield Plus up on Friday and noticed that when I point the muzzle up, the trigger safety will move enough to where I can pull the trigger without depressing the trigger safety (by pulling the side of the trigger) 1 out of every 10 times. Of course, this concerns me if ever I were to drop my Shield Plus directly muzzle up. Will it ever happen? Probably not, but I agree that a safety should be 100% for what is is designed for....not 90%, and I should not have to bring a brand new spankin' pistol in for repair.
I've taken apart my Shield 1.0 to install an Apex Duty internal trigger assembly, and I can take the Plus apart, but I am not sure how difficult it would be to take apart the trigger safety in order to stretch its spring to take out that play. Anyone know how to do this or know if there is a video out there on Youtube on how to fix this issue (at least, an issue for me).
 

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Have you contacted Smith and Wesson? I would do that before taking it apart. Get their customer service involved right away. If you take it apart and screw something up you may void your warranty.
 
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