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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Unknown custom maker of a earlier Tennessee Poor Boy that came into my possession today. Been lookin' for a .45 cal for a long time... ;)





And here is the modern Pedersoli equivalent...that also found it's way to my door today...



One's leaving the stable....

You get to decide!


giz
 

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I'd keep the original
But I'm about always wrong too
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
azmick said:
I'd keep the original
But I'm about always wrong too

Nay...your right as rain :mrgreen:

I've been after a good .45 cal for more then two years. When it rains, it pours. These two came available today. I picked up the Pedersoli this morning. It is a fair representation of a poor boy .45 and known to be extremely accurate. I was happy!

Then the work of art came available the same day. Less then 2 hours later. The custom was available at less then the used Pedersoli.... Somebody had to trade in GrandDad's gun to get yet, another Black Gun.... :roll:

Go figure....

giz
 

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If they sold their heirloom to finance a black rifle, then their stupidity was your gain. Good catch.
 

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Giz, If it weren't for the "Black Gun" popularity nowadays........many of the great old guns would never make their way to the marketplace. AND.........into our grubby little hands. :lol: The younger generation wants "firepower" over quality firearms. So....they trade-in Dad's (or Granddad's) old shootin' irons. It's to our advantage! ;) Bob
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QC,

Actually, the only Poor Boy is the Pedersoli. I kinda Fibber McGee'd that one a little bit. :mrgreen:

The Flintlock is very much a Tennessee Mountain gun. It has some distinct features that makes it so. Iron mounted, relatively plain (not a lot of fancy carving or inlays), deeply curved buttstock, smaller calibers usually, English style locks. The trigger guard typically squared at the bottom, the breach tang often extended. Butt plate is well rounded.

giz
 

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If the previous owner was not into 'the black arts', I would wonder about the condition of the bore
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Bill,

A Shimmel or a Poor Boy style of rifle typically lacked side plates, butt and toe plates, had no nose cap piece, ramrod entry pipe (some only had one ramrod thimble - usually the front one) and used a simple trigger guard. Patch box is typically missing, however a simple hole drilled in the stock and filled with patch grease may be used. Most are Iron mounted on the few of the parts that are used.

Plain wood with virtually no carving and little ornamentation. For all the style lacks, it is really still a good looking gun ;) ...

The Pedersoli in the OP is pretty much a poorboy...the only ornamentation is the brass butt-plate

giz
 

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..................and here I thought it was a samich!!!! okfvnail Bob
 

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A very good reply, actually. As extrapolated, it means every firearm the forebears I encountered from the time I was a wee little guy were 'poor boys.'

Nobody owned a fancy gun, and everything showed wear; most probably were acquired third-hand anyway, but it doesn't matter. A Winchester '97 shotgun is designed to bring in the pheasants and squirrels, not look fancy -- or so my dad thought.

And so it has gone with a great many legacy guns.

Right now, my father-in-law has a legacy cheap Parker SxS. How cheap? Has a damascus barrel; was bottom of the Parker line, and mostlikely the one sold mail-order. Has a damaged lock and hammer on one side, because of which my son is working to get custody of the arm so he can have it fixed. Has barrel dents; it sat in the henhouse for close to 30 years, 'cause for a long time they were chicken-ranchers. Don't knows how many coyotes it has shot, but I'll bet it has thumped a few into the promised land.

Real value? Not a lot. Sentimental value? Huge. It's been in the family for more than a century.

Bill
 

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That decision is a no-brainer!

I had one of the DGW southern poor boys that was very similar to the flintlock - lots of gun for the money. It was a .45, too.

xtm
 

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Smithfan said:
Right now, my father-in-law has a legacy cheap Parker SxS. How cheap? Has a damascus barrel; was bottom of the Parker line, and mostlikely the one sold mail-order. Has a damaged lock and hammer on one side, because of which my son is working to get custody of the arm so he can have it fixed. Has barrel dents; it sat in the henhouse for close to 30 years, 'cause for a long time they were chicken-ranchers. Don't knows how many coyotes it has shot, but I'll bet it has thumped a few into the promised land.

Real value? Not a lot. Sentimental value? Huge. It's been in the family for more than a century.

Bill
said Parker serial # dates to ~1887 and is an exposed hammer non ejecter. i think it's in decent condition except for the one busted lockwork which i think is an internal spring that could be fixed by midwest gunworks or Doug turnbull pretty cheaply. there are low pressure shotshells available specifically for shooting in old damascus guns. i dont think any parkers were cheap by any relative standard back in the day. i would love to see it stay in the family since it has been in the family for 100+ years. the wood is in great shape.

all my hand/long guns are shooters, and i try to go out of my way to buy the best quality used i can so i dont feel upset when an addtional stock ding gets placed or feel bad about shooting a "rare" gun. my pre 27 3.5 incher is probly most rare guun right now and i love shooting it. although you could argue that in PRK, all my Smiths and colt 1911 are getting "rare" :lol:
 
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