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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Requesting help dating my "new to me" purchase. I'm afraid that all I know is, I want home protection and I love pretty vintage items.
the serial number is 480770 (stamped on the butt and cylinder) and it's a 38 special CTG with model # 10832
Need more info? Please let me know.

I'd just love to know what I have... and maybe a value (I cringe as I may discover I paid too much... but I love it). Thank you in advance!

498770
 

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Mid 1920's Military & Police Model of 1905 Change 4 wearing 1945-1968 era grips. Given that it is about the most popular model (1899 to present) ever and not a collector piece, whatever the regional market will bear. Around middle Tennessee I'd guess either side of $325. Again that varies. It is an excellent choice for home defense and a very practical first hand gun in my opinion. In this instance age is not paricularly your friend.

The number on the butt is what counts. The barrel, cylinder and ejector also bear that number (and the inside of the original grips). No model numbers prior to 1957 by the way.
 

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Those aren't original stocks (grips), but with the diamond relief pattern are desirable money wise, plus they will fit much better in the hand while shooting. Not sure the finish is original, but it looks nice either way. That gun will shoot as straight and accurate as you can, nice acquisition! I agree with Waidmann's estimate on value, but today's market is crazy and unstable, it might go for even more to a hungry buyer!
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum! Nice M&P revolver. Make sure everything functions well, especially if your plans for it include home/personal defense.
 
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Thank you for the replies. I'm now satisfied with my purchase price though it exceeds the $325. Can the date be nailed down?
I have one near that serial number and have been told 1926, but that was long ago on another forum. We do thankfully have folks here that hopefully can narrow it down for you. Hang tight and keep checking in, I'm sure someone will chime in. In the meantime go buy more beauties like the one you have a send us pictures, we love them! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have one near that serial number and have been told 1926, but that was long ago on another forum. We do thankfully have folks here that hopefully can narrow it down for you. Hang tight and keep checking in, I'm sure someone will chime in. In the meantime go buy more beauties like the one you have a send us pictures, we love them! :)
I'm stuck on the "No models numbers prior to 1957" though.. this one has a model number.
 

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I'm stuck on the "No models numbers prior to 1957" though.. this one has a model number.
Not quite, Smith and Wesson didn't start with model numbers until 1957, the number on the butt of your gun is the serial number, any others that differ from the serial number on the butt are simply assembly numbers used when the gun was manufactured.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Not quite, Smith and Wesson didn't start with model numbers until 1957, the number on the butt of your gun is the serial number, any others that differ from the serial number on the butt are simply assembly numbers used when the gun was manufactured.
Ahh... I'm mistaken about that second number then... Thank you for clarifying. I'm now encouraged that the gun may be older. I'm still interested in a date if anyone can determine.
 

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Not quite, Smith and Wesson didn't start with model numbers until 1957, the number on the butt of your gun is the serial number, any others that differ from the serial number on the butt are simply assembly numbers used when the gun was manufactured.
Bingo.
 

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In the frame recess, on the crane and inside the side plate are what were called soft parts assembly numbers. These were once used during the tedious hand fitting process of that day. Frames were made up at a much slower speed than cylinders and barrels.
The conventional wisdom is that 500000 left the factory in 1927. The shipping date and original purchaser (usually a business) will set you back another $100. There is a stickee on requesting a historical letter.

You can also post it on the other forum (Smithandwessonforum) and see if someone has a closer number/date.
 

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You can also post it on the other forum (Smithandwessonforum) and see if someone has a closer number/date.
That's this one. The other one is smith-wessonforum.com
 
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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! The .38 M&P is one of the most produced handguns on the planet. S&W has made around 7 million of them since 1899. So, it has to be a very unusual example to have significant value. Folks have given you a narrow ballpark for when it was shipped. The only way to get an accurate date is to pay for an historian's letter of authenticity...$100. I don't recommend it unless your gun is an heirloom that you want documented for posterity. It's a great shooter. Enjoy it!
 

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As a quick aside, since it was in your title, CTG simply means cartridge. A 38 Special cartridge. Nothing to do with the name of the gun, simply its caliber.

It's old enough that metallurgy isn't what it is today, so don't shoot hot loads, but new enough that there's no concern using it. Luckily it's 39 Special and not an obsolete caliber like 38S&W, as many are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
As a quick aside, since it was in your title, CTG simply means cartridge. A 38 Special cartridge. Nothing to do with the name of the gun, simply its caliber.

It's old enough that metallurgy isn't what it is today, so don't shoot hot loads, but new enough that there's no concern using it. Luckily it's 39 Special and not an obsolete caliber like 38S&W, as many are.
Sorry, can you elaborate on what you were saying about the 39?
 
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