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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Smith 4" 500 revolver. I noticed that it is not as smooth as my Colt revolvers regarding the release of the cylinder. Also, there is a drag line on the inside of the revolver that has developed. I assume it is from the ejector rod. For an expensive revolver, is this common for the Smith 500. What would cause this as I am not very happy as I haven't even fired it.

My recently purchased Colt Python is much smoother than the 500 when releasing the cylinder. The ejector rod on the Smith is not loose as I checked it.

Any suggestions? Should I contact Smith and return for repair/adjustment.

Thanks,
SK21
 

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You didn't say whether or not you purchased the gun new or used.

Regardless, comparing the Mdl 500 to the Python is like comparing a 1/2 ton pickup to a off-road quarry dump truck. If you purchased it used, a visit to a qualified gunsmith or S&W is in order. You don't know what or how many the previous owner fired.*

If new, ship it back to S&W.

*if you bought it from someone like my neighbor, who boasted about exceeding recommended loads by 20% in his Mdl 500, the factory should definitely look at it.
 

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A common issue with X frames is the ejector rod unscrewing. Check and make sure it's tight.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The pistol was purchased new and is unfired other than factory tested. I did call Smith & Wesson Customer service and the rep stated that the drag line is common on the revolvers as the release mechanism, etc. is spring loaded. Also,he stated there is a tighter cylinder fit to frame on the big revolvers and as long as I can release the cylinder that there should not be any issues.

Not for sure if that is true or not.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! If the "drag line" is on the face of the recoil shield or on the circumference of the cylinder, they are entirely normal for a S&W revolver. Revolvers tend to "loosen up" as they are fired. Shoot it some and see if it doesn't settle in.
 

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I've got a 460V 5" revolver that I've had for 3+ years, I've shot it alot, and I've experienced no problems of any kind with it. However, I only shoot .45LC's in it. Everyone I know that's shot either a 500, or a 460, with the respective Magnum ammunition, don't shoot those guns too much with the respective gun's Magnum ammunition, since the recoil's just plain brutal.
 

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Actually, almost all I feed in my 460V are hot 460S&W Magnum rounds. Never have put 45C or 454 Casull in it. Oh, maybe I'll get to hunt with it someday, but for me, there's really no other reason to own an X-Frame than to just go big!
I've got a 460V 5" revolver that I've had for 3+ years, I've shot it alot, and I've experienced no problems with it. However, I only shoot .45LC's in it. Everyone I know that's shot either a 500, or a 460, with the respective Magnum ammunition, don't shoot those guns too much, since the recoil's just plain brutal.
 

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Actually, almost all I feed in my 460V are hot 460S&W Magnum rounds. Never have put 45C or 454 Casull in it. Oh, maybe I'll get to hunt with it someday, but for me, there's really no other reason to own an X-Frame than to just go big!
That's fine, it's your gun, and you should use it as you please – to each their own. The reason I have bigger guns, and fire lighter-powered ammunition’s, because it’s a great way to mitigate felt recoil while still having the power of the ammunition selected. I freely admit to being a "recoil wimp". I also use that “formula” with my L-Framed 686 4” – I don’t use .357 Magnum ammunition, I only use .38 Special, and with excellent performance, and minimal recoil.
 

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No offence, DrDoctor. You did say "Everyone I know" and we don't know each other. Perhaps we can meet and shoot our 460Vs together!
That's fine, it's your gun, and you should use it as you please – to each their own. The reason I have bigger guns, and fire lighter-powered ammunition’s, because it’s a great way to mitigate felt recoil while still having the power of the ammunition selected. I freely admit to being a "recoil wimp". I also use that “formula” with my L-Framed 686 4” – I don’t use .357 Magnum ammunition, I only use .38 Special, and with excellent performance, and minimal recoil.
 

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No offence, DrDoctor. You did say "Everyone I know" and we don't know each other. Perhaps we can meet and shoot our 460Vs together!
Sounds Good!!! You're in Texas, and I'm on the Atlantic Coast, but we're in the process of relocating back to the central US, probably in or near the mountains. Warmest regards to you... Thx.
 

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Where is the drag line? "inside the revolver" is kind of hard to envision. :D
 

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Where is the drag line? "inside the revolver" is kind of hard to envision. :D
My revolvers have a drag-line on the outside of the cylinder in between the cylinder stop notches. It's been my experience that the more I've used the revolver, the drag-line becomes more pronounced with usage, up to a certain point. Then, it just pretty much stays the same. I don't mind the drag-line (I consider it as "patina"), just like I don't worry about the "burn rings" at the front of the cylinder. If I go to the hassle of cleaning it, it looks great until the gun's fired again, and then it's got burn rings. Besides, I've heard that the burn rings just "tighten up the barrel/cylinder gap"... I dunno 'bout that, but it does sound good.
 

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My revolvers have a drag-line on the outside of the cylinder in between the cylinder stop notches. It's been my experience that the more I've used the revolver, the drag-line becomes more pronounced with usage, up to a certain point. Then, it just pretty much stays the same. I don't mind the drag-line (I consider it as "patina"), just like I don't worry about the "burn rings" at the front of the cylinder. If I go to the hassle of cleaning it, it looks great until the gun's fired again, and then it's got burn rings. Besides, I've heard that the burn rings just "tighten up the barrel/cylinder gap"... I dunno 'bout that, but it does sound good.
was thinking that, but it doesn't sound like those would be considered "inside the revolver." For S&W revolvers, drag lines are by design. The bolt drops between the notches.

For Colt V-spring revolvers or SAAs, the bolt should only drop into the notch and there should not be any drag line between the notches.

For new Colt revolvers like the Python, the bolt drops between the notches just like S&W, but the notches are so huge that there isn't much area to have a drag line between notches. Also, since all new Colts are stainless steel, it's hard to even notice.
 

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was thinking that, but it doesn't sound like those would be considered "inside the revolver." For S&W revolvers, drag lines are by design. The bolt drops between the notches.

For Colt V-spring revolvers or SAAs, the bolt should only drop into the notch and there should not be any drag line between the notches.

For new Colt revolvers like the Python, the bolt drops between the notches just like S&W, but the notches are so huge that there isn't much area to have a drag line between notches. Also, since all new Colts are stainless steel, it's hard to even notice.
I agree č you – stainless steel guns do seem to resist the drag-line better than do the blued guns, since the first thing to go is the bluing. Beyond that, you’ve got me at the disadvantage – I’m semi-knowledgeable (emphasis on “semi”) concerning Smith & Wesson revolvers, I’m totally out of my wheelhouse č regards to semi-autos, Colt’s, SSA’s, Ruger’s, Kimber’s, Taurus’, et al.
 

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I think the drag line the OP is talking about is from the ejector pin(? if that's what it's called) contacting the recoil shield (if that's what IT is called. That pin is spring loaded and fits in a hole in the frame and is what locates the rear of the cylinder and locks the cylinder in the frame when firing. A drag line is normal. I think the reason why it seems more pronounced on blued guns is because the bluing provides more contrast between the color of the blued frame and the 'scratch' that removed the bluing.
 

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I think the drag line the OP is talking about is from the ejector pin(? if that's what it's called) contacting the recoil shield (if that's what IT is called. That pin is spring loaded and fits in a hole in the frame and is what locates the rear of the cylinder and locks the cylinder in the frame when firing. A drag line is normal. I think the reason why it seems more pronounced on blued guns is because the bluing provides more contrast between the color of the blued frame and the 'scratch' that removed the bluing.
That’d also show more on a blued gun than a stainless steel one. But, it wouldn’t show when the cylinder’s in battery, it’d show only when the cylinder’s open/out of the frame’s window. In any case, it isn’t anything that I’d worry about – it’s comes with the territory of using a revolver.
 

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I pulled out my 460V, and my 686, revolvers to give them a closer look. The cylinders on both have very faint drag lines between the cylinder stop notches, but the drag lines are noticeable if you’re aware that they exist, and are looking for them. I looked inside of the frame windows of each, at the recoil shield, and yes, there’s a “drag line” there, too. It’s created from the rear locating pin that’s on the back end of the ejector rod. That drag line’s also inevitable from the opening and closing of the cylinder. When I close the cylinder on either gun, that drag line isn’t visible. Further, as discussed: the drag line around the outside of the cylinder would be quite noticeable on a blued gun as compared to its stainless steel counterpart. As for the drag line on the recoil shield – it’d be more noticeable on a blued gun as compared to its stainless steel counterpart with the cylinder open, but when it’s in battery, it won’t be visible, much less noticeable, since the cylinder’s larger than the recoil shield (as least it is on my revolvers…). Again, I don’t think any of this is worth losing any sleep over – I certainly won’t.
 
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