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Is there any significance to the model number looking like it is 669? Also, this thing is mint, is it worth much? I have only put about 100 rounds through it and it didn't look like it was even shot before that.
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum! Pics would also help us answer any other questions you may have.
 

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I bought a model 66 but the stamp work is shoddy. It almost looks like it says 669. The serial # is 126K***. What can you tell me about it?
Does your revolver have a pinned barrel, and/or a recessed cylinder (the rear of the cylinder charge holes allow the cartridge to fit flush)? Your revolver falls into an age range that could make it either a M66-1, or a M66-2. That would also be shown inside the yoke cut (open the cylinder and look where the yoke hinges). It would say Mod 66-1, or Mod 66-2.

Also, what is the barrel length, 2-1/2, 4, or 6 inches? If 2-1/2, it will have a 'round butt" frame with small stocks (grips). If a 4" or 6" it will be a square butt frame, most likely with large target stocks, but possibly a smaller magna stock. As Curt suggested, pictures will help us help you. The Serial number is in two places on the square butt guns; inside the yoke cut, and on the bottom of the butt frame (you'd have to take the target stocks off to see it). On the round butt, the SN is only on the bottom of the butt frame.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Your M66-2 is not P&R...pinned and recessed. A pinned barrel has a "bump" just to the rear of where the barrel and frame join. That bump is a transverse pin that is used to "pin" the barrel to the frame. Your cylinder chambers are not countersunk (recessed). Recessing allows the rim of the cartridge to be surrounded by cylinder metal to reinforce it. It was felt that reduced the chance of having the casing "blow out," especially with magnum and some .22 LR cartridges. The benefits of P&R vs. cost resulted in their elimination just before your gun was made. As for the stamp, I see an overstruck 2 on top of a 1. It was poorly done but not atypical.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Your M66-2 is not P&R...pinned and recessed. A pinned barrel has a "bump" just to the rear of where the barrel and frame join. That bump is a transverse pin that is used to "pin" the barrel to the frame. Your cylinder chambers are not countersunk (recessed). Recessing allows the rim of the cartridge to be surrounded by cylinder metal to reinforce it. It was felt that reduced the chance of having the casing "blow out," especially with magnum and some .22 LR cartridges. The benefits of P&R vs. cost resulted in their elimination just before your gun was made. As for the stamp, I see an overstruck 2 on top of a 1. It was poorly done but not atypical.
You sure a 66-2? I looked at that number and it appeared to be 66-1; or do I need new eyeballs Guy?
 

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Wouldn't make sense to overstamp a 66-2 with a -1. Besides, it configures as a M66-2:
• 66-2 1982 Eliminate cylinder counter bore and pinned
barrel / Slight Change in cylinder length to 1.62”
SCS&W, 4th Edition, page 270
 

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You sure a 66-2? I looked at that number and it appeared to be 66-1; or do I need new eyeballs Guy?
Wouldn't make sense to overstamp a 66-2 with a -1. Besides, it configures as a M66-2:
What I saw looked like it may have been lightly stamped with a -2, but a -1 has been overstamped. Maybe it's the other way around, but the -1 is more prominent. That is odd, because the revolver is definitely a -2, since the barrel pin is gone and the cylinder isn't recessed.

No matter, really; the price you paid is a good bit less than the gun is worth.
 
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