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Going by the ser. no. alone, it's a 4th Model .38 D.A. produced toward the end of this model's run in 1909. About a half-million produced, so not exceptionally rare in the standard barrel lengths (3-1/4 to 5"). That's .38 S&W, by the way, not .38 Special.
 

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I’d be interested in seeing it as well I’m getting really into the old old models because a lot of them are affordable and over looked. I just love the top break ejection and style.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Going by the ser. no. alone, it's a 4th Model .38 D.A. produced toward the end of this model's run in 1909. About a half-million produced, so not exceptionally rare in the standard barrel lengths (3-1/4 to 5"). That's .38 S&W, by the way, not .38 Special.
Thank you so much. It hasn't been fired since about 1918 and I wonder if it is safe to fire and what ammo would be appropriate? I am also curious about what D.A. means. Please excuse my lack of knowledge about this subject.
Thanks again
Rufus
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! DA means "double action" which is a gun that can be cocked and fired with one trigger pull. A "single action" is a gun that has to be manually cocked before it will fire. These designations have been around a looonnnnnggg time and even hold today for semi-auto pistols. S&W introduced its DA line in 1880 and it was very innovative at the time. It features auto ejection of spent cartridges when broken open. It was designed for black powder cartridges but, if it is in good working condition with proper timing and lockup, you can shoot modern .38 S&W ammo in it. It produces a mild recoil and they are very fun to shoot.
 
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