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Why is that an "OR" choice?
 

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Is BOTH an option???? If you have the means...why not?;)
 

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Given the economic times, I am guessing you can afford one. Will it be used or is it merely for visual enjoyment? For example, I have a Model 1917 Hand Ejector built in 1918 that I mstly enjoy looking at and listening to the stories I imagine it tells me. I shoot it occasionally. I also have a Model 22-4 with a 5 1/2” barrel, lanyard loop and all the modern updates and while it looks good it is not a 1917. What is it? It is a shooting machine that is a ball to take out!

So, for visual pleasure, buy the P&R. If you want to shoot it extensively, get the endurance package.

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469021


Kevin
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I own them both. I am just checking to see who prefers P&R or Endurance Package Smith .44 Magnums.

My take is that I love P&R Smiths the most. That is how Smith started making model 29 and 629, and the looks of those features as well as the exclusivity of them makes them special.

At the same time, the early versions featuring the “full endurance package”, still have all forged steel parts, the firing pin on the hammer, classic wood target stocks, and pretty much look like the originals, but are built to be more durable. I like being able to shoot full power loads in large quantities without worrying about breaking a “collectable” P&R. Additionally, the fact that they are less “collectable” helps me to be less concerned about holster wear or dings when carrying them in the woods and sweat, dirt or humidity.

So, I’m happy having both for different reasons.

I have found that every 29-2 that I own has better factory D/A triggers than ever 629-3 that I own. I’ve had a friend work on all three of my 629-3’s to get the DA trigger to be more smooth. I am fine with a heavy trigger, I just have trouble with accuracy with a heavy trigger with a hard “wall”, and each of my 629-3’s had hard “walls” that were inconsistent from one chamber to the other. Mr. Smitty fixed them for me.
 

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I bought a pinned and recessed 6 1/2" S&W 29-2 .44 magnum today to go with my 4" S&W 29-2 .44 magnum. The 6 1/2" dates to early 1977 and the 4" dates to 1980.

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When I was in the market for a .44 Magnum, I wanted stainless because it was for a hunting sidearm that would be carried in all weather conditions ... so, 629 it was.

When deciding between dashes, I figured that since I would be buying used w/o knowledge of how much the previous owner(s) had fired it ... I opted for one with the endurance package. I had settled on either a 629-3 or 629-4. The first one I found that met my conditions at a price I found agreeable turned out to be the 629-3.

I’m quite satisfied with my purchase.

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That being said, at some point in the future I’m pretty sure my collection will end up including a P&R 29
 

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Even with full bore 44 mag loads, I doubt you will ever shoot an older m29 enough to have any problems. From what I understand the ones who had problems with the older m29’s were Silhouette Shooters that were shooting thousands of max and beyond max loads. I own a pre 29 that the previous owner shot a lot and only magnum loads. Still tight as a tick, but he didn’t put anywhere near the volume a competition Silhouette shooter would.
 

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P&R or nothing for me.
 
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