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Stumbled across this, it was made in 1988 for the Indiana State Police, interesting that it was near the end of the revolver era.


The video shows how Officer Mustache uses the Safariland Comp 2 speed loader, not sure what model revolver it is exactly but it is some flavor of Smith and Wesson, looks like maybe a K frame? The creative approach to speed loader pouches was interesting, more of a leather thong than a pouch, as was the creative use of boots and belt for one handed reloads, or “how to take your balls hostage.” Lol

Interesting seeing old training films like this though, so I thought I’d share.

Since the video apparently does not want to embed:

https://youtu.be/b2B48FmLkys
 

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Interesting video. I believe the revolver is a model 67, a K frame and .38 special. Good info on use of speed loaders. :cool:
 

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Pretty good video and only dated because police don't use revolvers anymore. But some of "us" do! The thing that has changed and can get you in trouble is the different kinds of speed loaders available now. Some load the rounds into the cylinder by pushing on them but some by twisting the handle/knob.

This can get you really messed up if you use two different kinds in a competition course of fire and don't pay close attention. Yeah, ask me how I know...........
 

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The video opening sequence is a recreation of what happened to one of the CHP officers at the famous ‘Newhall Incident’, which had a huge and positive effect on LE firearms training nationwide.

The Safariland pouch was called the ‘split-six’, where 3 rds rode behind the belt, and 3 in front. It was designed so you could straddle the flap, and obtain a proper grip on the loader from the start.

The one thing odd, is the pouches on the off side. Most every agency taught speedloaders on the holster side....as most right handed revolver shooters use their right hand on the speedloader.

I’m guessing this agency put them on the off side, as that’s where many loop holders, and later dump pouches were placed.
 

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Great find!

We were taught a couple things contrary to the ISP film at the Dayton Police Academy. Ejection was done with the palm of dominant hand instead of the off hand thumb. Our agency issued K and J frame revolvers so the idea was training consistentcy and proper ejection/extraction with the short ejector rods of the J frame. Our dump pouches, subsequently speed loaders, were mandated to be on the strong side. When the Safariland speed loaders came out they were 50/50 with officers vs HKS.

We had one shooting where the officer was wounded and his hands were bloody. His reload with HKS speed loaders was slow and almost cost his life because you had to hold the cylinder still with the off hand while turning the release knob on the speed loader to get the rounds to release. His hands were wet with blood and he wasn't able to hold the cylinder from turning so he eventually stuck his fingers inside the frame to prevent the cylinder from rotating to get it charged. It worked out in the end but I'd say the Safariland vs HKS usage after that was about 90/10.
 

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First, it is a M66 as that's what Indiana issued and the position of the speed loaders on the belt is normal as the tongue of the belt is on the right ride. My agency issued Sam Brownes with integral D-Rings for the "Suicide Strap" so that's the way the belt sat and ammo was to the left of the buckle.

Last, in the demo that officer was horrible at reloading from loops!
 

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KOOL!
 
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