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One thing I do collect is meat cleavers from the turn of or early 20th century. The big one has a light mark that says 'MILWAUKEE 7' and the other letters I can't make out. It is 1/4" thick. The small one is a Robeson Shur-edge with nice brass pins and interesting wood. Not really classified as weapons but definitely 'edged'. James
 

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well, I was way off but here it is anyway :mrgreen:
 

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Gee Wally, did Eddie swipe my post from yesterday?

This heavy cleaver has a shield logo reading "Briddell of CRISFIELD" and Made in "U.S.A." stamped on the blade. It has been in the family ~100 years and was brought out for use when butchering livestock. I once split 100 fryers with it for a church fundraising barbeque, and it made quick work of that chore!


We had a much smaller version hanging next to this one, but I don't know what happened to it.

Since posting this photo the first time yesterday, I googled Briddell and got some information. Charles D. Briddell was a blacksmith/knifemaker near Crisfield, Maryland who served the watermen and boatmen on Chesapeake Bay in the late 1800s. ~1910, he bought a building in downtown Crisfield and opened a cutlery factory employing a good number of locals. Production was at the highest levels during WWII when he received a special award from the US Navy for excellence. After the War, his son sold the factory to Carvel Hall Cutlery.

Heavy cleavers aren't very forgiving when you're tired - one mis-aimed whack and it's off to the ER!

xtm
 
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