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Discussion Starter #1
A couple weeks ago I ran into a very nice blue model 57. It's still sitting at the gun shop. The consignment will be up this week. The gun looks NIB. Now for the interesting stuff. It has a 4" barrel. It has the S prefix in the serial number. Now for the interesting details. The barrel and cylinder serial numbers match but, do not match the frame. The barrel and cylinder match. So why were they swapped/replaced, was it made that way. Also on the rear face of the cylinder it has the refinish mark that is not seen much. That is the B with a diamond next to it. I know the gun is not a collector grade but damn it's nice. With box paper work the whole nine yards. So my question is. Why would the barrel and cylinder serial numbers match? And the frame does not. From what I understand the B with the diamond next to it was a factory refinish mark for warranty work. This one has me stumped. If I can pick it up for a good price. I just may get it. That way I'll have a nice shooter. Any thoughts as to why the frame does not match the barrel and cylinder. It's a interesting model 57 this gun could pass for NIB. The guy who has it on consignment told me. He owned it since new. He swears it has never been shot. Would a fair offer on this gun be 25 to 30% off top dollar? Many questions and possibilities on this one. I did not look under the grips but if the price is right. I'll pull them before I buy it.
To sum it up
We have a gun with non matching ser#'s a refinish mark all factory work WHY?
 

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There is a logical explanation, but it doesn't jive with what you've been told, IE: "The guy who has it on consignment told me. He owned it since new. He swears it has never been shot."

-This is a Frankengun.

-It's been refinished at least once.

-The barrel and cylinder are take offs from another gun. Why this was necessary is anyone's guess. Alot can happen to a revolver in nearly 50 years.

Don't let your inexperience and enthusiasm talk you into buying this gun without at least a chance to shoot it first. There is no chance that this pile of parts is unfired, so no one should protest that request unless they have something to hide.

If you do buy this gun, and are given the chance to shoot it first, understand that it will have absolutely no collectible value and you shouldn't pay more than half of the going rate for a 4" S-Frame 57, which is around $600, so therefore pay no more than $300. This is a shooter, and only a shooter.

If they won't take this deal, walk.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Drew
Thanks for your insight.
I know it's a FRANKEN GUN. However it's a nice one. If the price is good I'll pick it up. I figure the guy is telling the truth. With the exception he's not the original owner. Years ago someone may have sold & told him it was NIB and only factory fired. He's a old guy and I have no reason to not believe him. When I run into a gun like this. I figure out my offer based on the sum of the parts. If it turns out to be a good shooter. I will take it. Say the grips are worth $50 bucks. The barrel and cyl. complete Say $150 for the set. An easy $100 for the frame and side plate. Rear sight complete $20 bucks. Hammer and trigger complete another $50. Plus the presentation case another $50 So if I add that up. We are at $420. If I had to part that stuff out that's is about what I could get for it. So I figure I would go as high as $350 for the gun if it's a good shooter. I'll make an offer of $300 to $350. I would ask to shoot it before the purchase. It would be a hassle to part it out. But it would be easy to do. All the parts are like close to new condition and look new. It would be easy to post the parts on a forum. Or I could just gain a bunch of Nframe parts. The part what stumps me. Is why would someone have the factory do this work. When plenty of good smiths around. Many possibilities and who knows. The why's. I have seen these FRANKENS guns before they usually just had a barrel or cylinder swap never both. That is what I find interesting. It's top shelf gunsmith work but you can tell it has been refinished and it's very top shelf work. Hey the factory made this one two times. Sometimes I just know enough to get myself in trouble. In hand the gun appears to be fine. Timing, lock up etc all good,real good. Now the real question can I hit the broad side of a barn with it.
 

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Jim said:
The part what stumps me. Is why would someone have the factory do this work. When plenty of good smiths around. Many possibilities and who knows. The why's. I have seen these FRANKENS guns before they usually just had a barrel or cylinder swap never both.....
Think bulged barrel and split cylinder. Did you check to see if the soft-fit numbers matched on the crane?

First off, based upon your description, I doubt that the factory did all of this work. And I'm not confident that what factory work was done was applied to this frame.

You are probably looking at a non factory rework using parts that were once factory installed on another gun as service parts.

Also, some of these parts are re polished and re blued which will significantly influence their value if you part it out.

WHY? In the 1970's you couldn't find these guns for love-nor-money. They were more valuable then than now. Somebody wanted to keep this gun working or dump it for cash.

Good Luck.

Drew
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Drew
The real reason this gun interests me. Is that I always wanted a 41 mag 4" in a pinto. I would continue to FRANKEN the gun. I would have the frame re-blued to a very nice high polish deep black. And do the barrel and cyl. in nickel.
If it's a sound gun mechanically. And the price is right $350 or less. Then I'll get it. I have a friend who owns a plating shop. So the refinish work cost will not be much. And hopefully in the end I'll have a pinto 41 mag. I also have a friend who is a engraver. I would have him do a little bit here and there, just to make it special to me. I would have to call in favors to have the work done. Life is short I may as well enjoy it. This is stuff I like to do to entertain myself. I enjoy having the one of guns. A 41 mag my way.
Thanks for the insight. Later today I'm going to stop by the gun shop and really check the gun out and pull the grips. It should be interesting to find out what lurks under them.
Jim
 

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Jim,

now that I see what your going to do to it I can understand your interest. If it can be had for $350 ish then you will have a fine gun to do the mods to.

I hope the action and timing are right and you can get it for your price.

keep us informed!

Chris
 

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Not to be a party-pooper, but I suspect the 'bulged barrel/split cylinder' scenario is right on.
First, consider the reasoning behind changing out both the cylinder AND the barrel.
Next, consider the strain that the frame (surely) suffered in the 'event' that led to the switch.
Last, consider the remaining moving parts...hand, bolt, etc; Anything overloaded so much as to blow a 41 magnum N-frame always impacts what's left. j;zn;
The refinish mark was probably the cosmetic finish to a 'pieces-parts' rebuild.
FWIW, spend the extra $ 300 or so dollars and buy an original
example, Jim...
You'll be glad you did.
Don
;)
 

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DaveWW said:
I have a 1-1/2" inch piece of square steel rod milled flat on one side just for such occasions. You want to remove the cylinder and hold it up to the light and check the bottom of the topstrap for straightness. It may be bulged a hair, if so, pass on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I went to look at the 57 today. I looked that gun over with a fine tooth comb. I can't find anything wrong with the work done. I made an offer on it. And struck a deal contingent upon the gunsmiths inspection. I have to wait until Friday. If it does not sell by then, the guy will take my offer.. The crane and frame match They both have a F21 stamped on them along with the assembly number 4876. Under the grips on the frame it's stamped F21 4876 Also it has a triangle with the letter T in it. and a circle with a Z inside it. What up with the circle Z and the triangle T. If the gunsmith blesses off the gun I'll take it. I have plenty of faith in him. If anything is wrong with that gun he will find it. It may be a parts bucket, but DAMN it's nice parts bucket.

Don
I tend to agree with you. However I love a challange.

Dave
thanks for the tip


I guess it wasn't a total waste of time. While I was at the gun shop. I always dig through the holster junk boxes. I found a holster to tote the model 25 around the woods.

 

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Better pick up a little Ragu on the way home.... This is what we call a "Spaghetti Sauce Gun".

Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sebago Son said:
Better pick up a little Ragu on the way home.... This is what we call a "Spaghetti Sauce Gun".

Good Luck.
In my neck of the woods we call them a parts locker. Maybe the wife has some Ragu. Not sure but I'll turn that sucker " 57 " in what the Bro's call a GAT. When they see that Pinto I'll hear Dat's a bad GAT. I'll have to learn to shoot Gangsta style.
 

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"Rat, tat, tat,,,,,, didn't even have to use my gat,,,,,, today was a good day!"

kijnbfa Couldn't resist. Had to throw in a little rap to go with your gangsta gun!
 
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