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Hello everyone! A little bit about me: I currently live in Georgia, love gardening, raising ducks, DIY home projects and of course guns. :love:

I joined this forum in the hopes of helping get more information about my grandpa's gun, for my dad. He doesn't know much about it other than it was his dad's and that it was supposedly his military piece. Plus I enjoy history in general and would love to know more about the gun itself.
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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass, Jawja Gurl ;)! You have a .380 British Service Revolver that was modified, probably in the 1950's, by Parker Hale in the UK to shoot .38 Special. The ramp front sight was added during the modification. These guns were imported in bulk and sold in the US for $10 to $40 or so, in the 1950-60's. Your gun was made in the 1940-41 era before the US entered WWII. In 1942, we began numbering them beginning with a "V." The BNP stamps stand for Birmingham Nitro Proof which the British tested and stamped every component that was designed to contain the pressure of a firing cartridge. That's why you see it on the barrel and every cylinder chamber. Where this was done is stamped on the left side knuckle of the frame but has been so polished I can't make out the stamps. Anyway, it's a heirloom and in pretty good shape for its age. Congratulations!

Edit: I was able to magnify the knuckle stamps and it appears to have the downward E which I believe indicates Enfield as the proof house. An expert will be along shortly to clarify/amplify.
 

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Welcome from the Texas Panhandle.
 
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Welcome to the forum.

The hole in the base of the frame was for a lanyard loop, which has been removed. Also, the barrel is now referred to as the "heavy barrel" on more recently made pistols.

Note that this revolver could be casually mistaken for a "Pre-10" or a M&P or Military and Police model revolver. It has a much more interesting history.

Very nice family heirloom.
 
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Welcome from middle Ga. Hang around and post often. Bunch of nuts around here in many ways, but some really knowledgeable people too. BTW, we like pictures of many things as well as guns.
 

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Ok, maybe I can decipher some of these. On the upper left, the broad arrow indicated British Government ownership. Below that and mostly erased is likely a crown over the V8 or W8. The crown looks like the crown over BNP proof marks elsewhere on the gun. This is called an inspection mark and the letter/number indicates the inspector. The downward E indicates it was inspected at the Royal Arms Factory at Enfield.

The lower front left crossed swords is the Birmingham Proof House view mark. The letters and number indicate O - proofed in 1963, B - proofed in Birmingham, and the 3 is the rank of the inspector with 1 being highest. So we know your gun didn't enter into the civilian market until 1963. There should also be a released from service mark which is two broad arrows, point to point, somewhere on the gun. It is possible it was removed during refinishing.

That's about the best I can do. Perhaps a real expert will show up with additional or clarifying information.
 
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Welcome to the forum!
 
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