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Welcome to the forum. You have what looks like a model 10-7. When you open the cylinder that should be stamped on the frame.I don't have my book handy, but my model 10-7 with a serial number staring with 8D was made in 1981. I rough guess would put yours in the late 70's, maybe 1978-79. Your M10 in is really nice shape
 

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THX for that. I'm also trying to learn (with some research today) about the difference between a '38 special' and a '38 S&W SPECIAL'. It appears they are NOT interchangeable. A 38 S&W will not fit in the hole of a 38 Special, and a 38 Special is too long for the cylinder of a 38 S&W. Am I on the right track here, as what is stamped on the barrel is clearly '38 S&W SPECIAL CTG' ?
 

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.38 S&W - Wikipedia It does appear that the bullets are specific to these two models and NOT interchangeable, or am i reading this incorrectly? The gun barrel clearly shows ''38 S&W SPECIAL CTG' ' Just want to make sure I get bullets that are appropriate for this firearm and not wast time and money with the wrong bullets.
 

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Welcome to the Forum from South Texas!
 
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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Let me see if I can confuse you further. The .38 S&W cartridge was originally introduced in 1876, in black powder, and was primarily chambered in vintage top break handguns. The .38 S&W Special (or AKA .38 Special) was introduced in 1899 as a black powder round, but quickly converted to smokeless powder, and was exclusively chambered in S&W hand ejectors until after WWII. The British adopted the .38 S&W as the .38/200 military cartridge in the 1800's and used it up through WWII. The USA adopted the .38 Colt cartridge as their military cartridge to replace older single action .45 cal. military guns until 1911 when the 1911 semi-auto pistol was selected to replace .38 Colt chambered military guns. The .38 S&W Special is a longer version of the .38 Colt which S&W submitted to the US military along with the .38 Hand Ejector as their recommended replacement for the .38 Colt which was considered an anemic round.

S&W made .38 S&W handguns for the British Commonwealth prior to and during WWII. They made a very few after WWII as the Model 11 but the vast majority of S&W hand ejector revolvers after WWII are exclusively .38 S&W Special, like yours. I hope that helps. :)
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum! Sweet looking model 10. Hopefully you take it to the range for some exercise. Enjoy!
 
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