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I bought my first S&W 38 special pistol this week and Im confused. It says 10-7. It has a pinned barrel, and a 5 screw frame. Well used but still nice. Is there a way to date this gun. I realize that there is lots of discussion but I’m still confused. Please help with any information. Thank you.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! We are going to need pictures of your gun to help you. The 5th screw was eliminated before model numbers were implemented. So, it is not possible a Mod 10-7 would have a 5th screw. Open the cylinder and post a picture of the stamping inside the yoke as well as pictures of all sides of the gun and the serial number on the butt.
 

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Yes there is. My 10-7 was shipped in Dec 1983. S/N is 18D3xxx.

 

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That's not a Model 10-7. You have a pre-Model 10 circa 1948 or 1949 with that serial number. Model 10-7's started being produced in 1977.
 
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That's not a Model 10-7. You have a pre-Model 10 circa 1948 or 1949 with that serial number. Model 10-7's started being produced in 1977.
Wow! Thank you very much. Would this gun be more valuable to a collector than a shooter? Is modern ammo still ok to shoot? I’m sorry for all the questions but this is my first pistol. Best
 

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Wow! Thank you very much. Would this gun be more valuable to a collector than a shooter? Is modern ammo still ok to shoot? I’m sorry for all the questions but this is my first pistol. Best
that's what this forum is for; questions. I would be more interested in a pre-model 10 6" barrel than a Model 10-7 but everyone is different. Modern ammo is fine. That will be a fun revolver to shoot. Very accurate.
 

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At the time, your gun would have been known as a .38 Military & Police revolver. As K22 says, it would have been made in late 1948 or early 1949. It incorporates the new "high speed hammer" introduced to this model coincident with the serial number change from S to C series in 1948. That particular style of hammer is also known as the "fish hook" hammer due to the shape of the hammer tang. S&W only produced that style hammer for 2-3 years. Even though these guns are slightly more desirable in this model over later versions, they have to be in pristine condition to bring any real value. This is S&W's bread and butter gun and they have made around 7 million of them since 1899. So, I'd put it in the $500-600 range around here.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
At the time, your gun would have been known as a .38 Military & Police revolver. As K22 says, it would have been made in late 1948 or early 1949. It incorporates the new "high speed hammer" introduced to this model coincident with the serial number change from S to C series in 1948. That particular style of hammer is also known as the "fish hook" hammer due to the shape of the hammer tang. S&W only produced that style hammer for 2-3 years. Even though these guns are slightly more desirable in this model over later versions, they have to be in pristine condition to bring any real value. This is S&W's bread and butter gun and they have made around 7 million of them since 1899. So, I'd put it in the $500-600 range around here.
Thank you. I will enjoy it even more now.
 

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Welcome to the forum.
 
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