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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello All:
I just picked up my Christmas present today after the wait...a brand new K22 Masterpiece, SN DLH279x, a model 17-9.

It is a beautiful firearm and I am very excited. That said, I have only put a couple of cylinders through it, but the double action trigger pull is far from the smooth affair I am used to with my centerfire Smiths. Now, I understand that the rimfire hammer spring has to be stronger for reliable rimfire ignition, but I am a little concerned about the overall lack of smoothness as well and the heavy spring weight.

Is this common with the new K22s? Does it just need to be shot, or is a tune up in my future? Single action trigger measures 5 1/4 lbs, and double action pull is beyond 10 lbs (and the range of my trigger pull gauge). Or....is this as good as it gets? Thoughts from those more experienced than I am with the K22 Masterpieces would be much appreciated....thanks in advance!
 

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Sell it and buy a TRUE classic S&W, not the "Classic Series" S&W, for the reasons you mentioned. Buy one complete with a pinned barrel and recessed charge holes

I once made the mistake of buying a new Model 24 Classic. My groups opened up to more than double the size of my groups with a TRUE classic S&W, due to the gritty trigger and hard trigger pull of the so-called "Classic" revolver. I quickly sold that revolver.

The MIM parts in the Classic Series, IMHO, are not suitable for doing a "trigger job" on them, since the case hardening is quite thin and the trigger job will likely cut right through the hardening and leave the no-longer-hardened contact points to wear very quickly.

They don't build them the way they used to. Sigh.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks--will aftermarket trigger return springs help? Can I back off that strain screw at all and still reliably ignite 22LR? If the old ones had a lighter trigger pull, they must have had lighter main spring tension in addition to being well fit, I would think....
 

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I bought a new 617 a couple years ago. While the weight of the trigger pull was pretty standard for a S&W revolver, it felt very gritty. I took the side plate off and found the hammer block was kind of rough and the channel it rides in wasn't all that smooth. I used 400grit sandpaper and mothers metal polish and smoothed the rough surfaces that come in contact, and oiled the internals.
That and just a couple hundred rounds smoothed things up nicely. To be honest, the lubrication and a couple hundred rounds may have been all that was needed
 

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I had the same issues with mine. Springs don't make an "action job". Careful stoning of the correct parts in the correct places and possibly some new springs will make your new gun as smooth as an old worn in model. I have noticed on these newer guns that the frame cavity seems to be done by EDM instead of milling. The finish left behind is smooth but "toothy". It seems to grab onto the internal parts prohibiting smooth movement. I remove all the internal parts and use a metal polishing compound on the rebound slide and work it back and forth a few hundred times. This along with some careful stoning will make your gun feel like it was built in the 50s.
 

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Just an FYI smoothing an action removes almost NO metal. What you want to remove are machining marks, burrs, and some sharp edges. If you are removing enough material to penetrate the surface hardening then you are ruining your gun and have no business being inside the action. I find the new MIM guns way more consistent and much easier to smooth out. I can guarantee that I have MIM guns with the lock that would put a smile on anybodies face after shooting them.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Glad to hear it. I found a 14# Brownell's trigger return spring left over from my 686 modification session and couldn't help but put it in the new K22--pretty much no difference over stock, it seems to be all the mainspring (and that grittiness) which may need polishing, shooting or both.

One funny thing--when I put it back together, I used Jerry Miculek's ballpoint pen method on the trigger slide assembly. When things were going back together slowly, I emptied the trigger return slide and found a pin to something along with the normal pin and spring in the channel..."Sh*t, where does this go? No, not the firing pin retaining pin...hmmmmmm. What the hell is it?"

It took me half an hour to figure out that it was the head of the ball point pen which has broken off during the assembly process!
 

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Hello All:
Single action trigger measures 5 1/4 lbs, and double action pull is beyond 10 lbs (and the range of my trigger pull gauge).
When pull-weight exceeds weight of the gun...that's a problem. Just tested my c.1980 K22 with an Ohaus recording gauge--breaks at just under 2 lbs. That's SA of course; as for DA, I don't much care, because if I'm going into combat, it won't be this gun I'm using.
 

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The last resort in an action job is replacing the springs. In the 30+ years I owned a gunsmithing business & did countless action jobs I can only recall one that needed a new spring (may have been 2). 99.9% of the time smoothing the insides does it, cut the friction, cut the trigger pull. Usually the rebound slide is the culprit, don't stone the sear You can do it the slow but easy way that drives wives up the wall from the clickety, clickety, clickety, clickety: put in some snap caps & dry fire it a couple thousand times, don't dry fire any rimfire w/out snap caps. The regular stone the rough spots can be done in 1/10 of the time. To make a point I polished my .22 magnum (which has an even tougher spring) down so the single action is 1 3/4 lbs. & about 3 times that double action, it has a factory spring.
 

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I:m afraid that the New Smith Wesson trigger on most of the new manufactured gun are about 9 lbs or over on double action. Sad but that is just the way they are. The single action pulls should be around 3 lbs. Factory set there is not much to do with them. That being said. They do have a tendency to get smoother ( Not Lighter) the more you shoot them. Another thing. I have said this before . " Build the shooter to the gun not the gun to the shooter. " I would work on you grip strength to assist you in getting a better feel for the gun. Work out with a tennis ball squeeze or get a grip strength trainer and help get you grip up to par with the gun . As you get stronger the pull gets lighter, Just a suggestion .

Layne12gun
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the helpful replies. Those are incredible results with the stock Springs, Injunbro and really underscores the value of smoothing. And Adirondacker, has your Gun ever been worked on or is the 3lb single action pull stock. And I know you won’t use it in combat, but is the DA pull at least smooth?
 

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Usually the rebound slide is the culprit, don't stone the sear You can do it the slow but easy way that drives wives up the wall from the clickety, clickety, clickety, clickety: put in some snap caps & dry fire it a couple thousand times, don't dry fire any rimfire w/out snap caps.
As a faster alternative to the "couple thousand times," what to you think about applying polishing compound (say, Clover 4-A) to the rebound slide, maybe other parts, except the sear, then doing the dry-firing? Never tried this myself, but have seen it recommended in gun magazine articles.
 

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And Adirondacker, has your Gun ever been worked on or is the 3lb single action pull stock. And I know you won’t use it in combat, but is the DA pull at least smooth?
DA pull is very smooth, but if accurate shooting is your objective, why would you need to use it? Except in timed competition where spitting out the lead is the main consideration.
 

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As a faster alternative to the "couple thousand times," what to you think about applying polishing compound (say, Clover 4-A) to the rebound slide, maybe other parts, except the sear, then doing the dry-firing? Never tried this myself, but have seen it recommended in gun magazine articles.


It takes longer to apply polishing compound & clean it off than to just hit the high spots w/ a stone. Dumping it in the action is not a good idea, most of it needs nothing.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Well, at 5 1/4 lbs, my single action pull isn’t great either. And since it is not recommended to touch the sear, how do you go about lightening it. In a Browning Buckmark, you could flip the trigger spring, but it seems like no such shortcut here except shooting and letting it wear in.
 

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Well, at 5 1/4 lbs, my single action pull isn’t great either. And since it is not recommended to touch the sear, how do you go about lightening it. In a Browning Buckmark, you could flip the trigger spring, but it seems like no such shortcut here except shooting and letting it wear in.


It's very unlikely the sear is a problem (only if it's cut crooked). The friction is on moving parts (look @ rebound slide 1st), they are what should be smoothed.
 
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I:m afraid that the New Smith Wesson trigger on most of the new manufactured gun are about 9 lbs or over on double action. Sad but that is just the way they are. The single action pulls should be around 3 lbs. Factory set there is not much to do with them. That being said. They do have a tendency to get smoother ( Not Lighter) the more you shoot them. Another thing. I have said this before . " Build the shooter to the gun not the gun to the shooter. " I would work on you grip strength to assist you in getting a better feel for the gun. Work out with a tennis ball squeeze or get a grip strength trainer and help get you grip up to par with the gun . As you get stronger the pull gets lighter, Just a suggestion .

Layne12gun
That reminds me of the old joke that women’s footwear aren’t why their feet hurt, it’s because their feet are the wrong size for their shoes. :D
 

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Glad to hear it. I found a 14# Brownell's trigger return spring left over from my 686 modification session and couldn't help but put it in the new K22--pretty much no difference over stock, it seems to be all the mainspring (and that grittiness) which may need polishing, shooting or both.

One funny thing--when I put it back together, I used Jerry Miculek's ballpoint pen method on the trigger slide assembly. When things were going back together slowly, I emptied the trigger return slide and found a pin to something along with the normal pin and spring in the channel..."Sh*t, where does this go? No, not the firing pin retaining pin...hmmmmmm. What the hell is it?"

It took me half an hour to figure out that it was the head of the ball point pen which has broken off during the assembly process!
That pin is one way Smith does a trigger stop. If that 14# spring is still too strong, cut 2 coils off the original spring and try that. BEWARE: The main reason that spring is so strong is for safety. If the gun is cocked and you drop it or bump the trigger, the trigger will rebound before the hammer can fall. At that point the hammer block will prevent the gun from discharging.
 

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When you cut a coil spring you increase the force needed to compress it. You reduce the preload but increase the stiffness.
 
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