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I have a 40 odd year old RCBS book and another nearing 20 years old.

About time for a new one. Interests are the common pistol calibers, like .38/.357, 9&10 mm, .45 ACP and .44 sp
and magnum.

And small rifle calibers like .223 and 7.62x39.

I have my favorite powders that I use. But availability is in question and I want to be up on new powders that are in the market.

Also any caliber specific stuff for rounds I mentioned. Especially .45 ACP and 7.62x39 would be nice.

Finally, is there somewhere I can at least backorder small pistol and small rifle primers and magnum small and large pistol primers? Let the inventory deplete pretty badly.

Thanks.
 

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Before all the Corona BS hit I used The Reloading Bench out of Tennessee and would see them at local Gun Shows. I would place order, they would bring to show and I would avoid the Hazmat fees. Not sure where you are from but might have someone near you that is same type store. As fr as new powders, I like BE-86 by Alliant as it is good on 357 mag and does have a reduced flash. As stated too Powder manufacturers will have load data on their sites. Good Luck.
 

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Reloading manuals are not recipe books like you would use in your kitchen. They are documented evidence about controlled experiments that show the safe limits of a variety of loads.

The reason that there are a number of reloading manuals is that each manufacturer features their own products (components, powder, tools) in their testing process that resulted in the documented experiments in the book. Substitute primers - you're on your own. Substitute bullet brand - you're on your own. Substitute case - you're on your own.

Hornady publishes books using their bullets and cases. Same thing for Sierra. They tend to use a variety of powders since they don't manufacture their own powder.

Lee publishes books using their tools.

Hodgdon publishes books using their powders.

Winchester publishes books using their primers, powders and bullets...

If you vary from the controlled conditions of the experiments (including substituting any components) you are doing your own experiments. If you are doing them without an instrumented barrel and controlled test conditions, you are taking on risk.

So... get the books that correspond to the products you're using.

The best background book for Reloading is General George C. Nonte's book "Modern Handloading"

Modern Handloading: Nonte, George C: 9780876910467: Amazon.com: Books

The Lee book is useful.

Lee Precision Modern Reloading

LEE PRECISION Modern Reloading 2nd Edition New Format: Lee, Richard: 5060511497404: Amazon.com: Books

You can get Hodgdon powder details online from their website. Note that there are some partnerships between companies. You'll find the manual for Winchester W-231 pistol powder suspiciously identical to the loads for Hodgdon HP-38 (they are, in fact, the same powder under different brand names).

I also have started loading with Alliant BE-86 (is the "BE" harkening back to a "BullsEye" heritage? Inquiring minds want to know...).
 

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If you are loading specialty rifle like I do, I suggest the Berger reloading manual but for long guns only, Berger makes no handgun bullets. I load from a Swift manual as well as I load 300 grain .452 A frames for my 460 S&W.

Brian Litz does a very interesting chapter in the Berger manual that can apply to any load, in any case, with any bullet. Brian is one of the foremost Ballisticians in the country today and is a co owner of Berger, I use the 'Berger' method to obtain accurate downrange trajectory with all my rifle handloads.
 

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Reloading manuals are not recipe books like you would use in your kitchen. They are documented evidence about controlled experiments that show the safe limits of a variety of loads.

The reason that there are a number of reloading manuals is that each manufacturer features their own products (components, powder, tools) in their testing process that resulted in the documented experiments in the book. Substitute primers - you're on your own. Substitute bullet brand - you're on your own. Substitute case - you're on your own.

Hornady publishes books using their bullets and cases. Same thing for Sierra. They tend to use a variety of powders since they don't manufacture their own powder.

Lee publishes books using their tools.

Hodgdon publishes books using their powders.

Winchester publishes books using their primers, powders and bullets...

If you vary from the controlled conditions of the experiments (including substituting any components) you are doing your own experiments. If you are doing them without an instrumented barrel and controlled test conditions, you are taking on risk.

So... get the books that correspond to the products you're using.

The best background book for Reloading is General George C. Nonte's book "Modern Handloading"

Modern Handloading: Nonte, George C: 9780876910467: Amazon.com: Books

The Lee book is useful.

Lee Precision Modern Reloading

LEE PRECISION Modern Reloading 2nd Edition New Format: Lee, Richard: 5060511497404: Amazon.com: Books

You can get Hodgdon powder details online from their website. Note that there are some partnerships between companies. You'll find the manual for Winchester W-231 pistol powder suspiciously identical to the loads for Hodgdon HP-38 (they are, in fact, the same powder under different brand names).

I also have started loading with Alliant BE-86 (is the "BE" harkening back to a "BullsEye" heritage? Inquiring minds want to know...).
BE-86 is pretty much Power Pistol with a Flash suppressant. Charge weights are not exactly the same as PP, but close
 

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There are also cartridge-specific loading books where someone aggregated all of the data from all of the available sources into one book for each cartridge. I have one for 7-08 and it lists bullets and powders from all of the major makers.
Personally, as stated above, I would start with the free online data from the powder and bullet makers and print out the data that you want - then put it in a 3-ring binder and create your own reloading book of recipes.
 

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I find Lymans 49th edition the most useful of the few manuals I have. I believe they have a 50th edition out now. I also printed out the data from Alliant and Hodgdon for the powders, calibers and bullet weights I load. Alliant will send a booklet for reloading with their powder for free. or you can download it. Here is a link to the page.
https://www.alliantpowder.com/resources/catalog.aspx
 

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I'm light years past 'recipes' in loading manuals but that comes from years of building handloads that are extremely accurate down range and I never condone what I do because not following guidelines can cause things to 'blow up' in your face. Everything I do has to to with external ballistics. From the time the pill leaves the muzzle to the time it impacts the target (or animal) whatever the case may be. My prep is always the same for straight wall cases and the same for bottlenecks. De-cap, tumble in STS media Anneal, NS or FL size depending on case and caliber, chamfer the case necks turn turn the necks if applicable, prime and load powder then seat the pills according to my accuracy tests and what my chrono tells me.
 

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To reload you need bullets and powder [and other stuff], therefore buy the reloading manual from your bullet manufacturer, powder company, and the current Lyman reloading manual. You get load data for your specific bullet and your specific powder. Lyman provides a 'variety of data' for jacketed bullets and cast lead bullets.

I have the Hornady (bullets), Accurate Arms (powder), Lyman for comparison, and Speer (it was on sale). I can find an answer for a mid-range load every time.
 
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