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Trying to figure out info on this gun I got from my wife’s grandma. Like year made and possible what it would be worth . Thanks
 

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Hey Richard,

Welcome to :bluelogo:

Way to go! Pics of yesteryear.......on your first post!!

Later, Mark
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum.:cool:
 
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Very early .38 M&P. Like pre WW1 early.kfjdrfirii
Model of 1902 1st change, probably shipped in 1903.

In that condition, not worth too much, but a fun shooter with standard velocity 38 wadcutters.
 

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".38 S&W Special & US Service Ctgs", from the markings on the left side of the barrel (right-click on the first photo, then left-click on "view image". Then left-click on the image and it will enlarge, the markings are clearly readable.

Not .38 S&W.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

It's a Military & Police 1st Model 1905 made between 1906-1909 in .38 Special and the "US Service cartridge" also stamped on the barrel refers to the 38 Long Colt cartridge which was still used by the US Army and had been the Army standard until replaced by the .38 Special. The 38 Long Colt is the same size case as the S&W 38 Special and can be fired in that gun but it's a bit shorter and less powerful...which led to its demise.

Value could range from $200- $400 +/- but, if it's a family heirloom...priceless.

This one is a a little earlier, an M&P Model of 1902 made about 1904

M&P 1904-1 stamp.JPG
 

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Your revolver was built on the "K" size frame. It's hard to tell from the photos if it's been plated or if the blued finish is worn. If plated, carefully remove the grips and see if a large "N" is stamped on the frame. That would indicate factory nickle.

The very early M1905 hand ejectors were shipped before S&W determined that it was necessary to heat treat and harden the revolver's cylinder in the manufacturing process.

https://www.smithandwessonforums.com/forum/s-w-revolvers-1857-1945/46915-when-did-heat-treated-hardened-cylinders-start.html

S&W started heat treating the cylinders of these revolvers in 1919. This model .38 Special K frames started heat treating after # 316648

For this reason, if you decide to shoot this don't use anything but standard velocity .38 ammunition. Note that "NATO" ammunition is above that pressure level, as is anything marked +P or +P+.

That information alone is worth more than the price of joining this forum. Incidentally, welcome to the forum!
 

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welcome01to the forum from SE Indiana. Very nice older Smith. I'd give $300 for an oldie that's not beat but has that hard earned patina finish. Ya got a nice one.
 

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Greetings mate nice old American iron..

Thewelshm
 

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Welcome from Virginia! I agree with mrerick and several others, early Model of 1902 . She certainly has a hard-won patina. And a nice Brauer Bros. Holster. Standard velocity .38 Specials should be fine , but stay away from any of the +p loads. Hank
 
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