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Hey everyone! I'm new to the forum and needed helping dating a revolver.

I got a S&W .22 long rifle CTG revolver from my dad and I was wondering what year it was. He got it from an uncle that passed away many years ago. It's been sitting in a locked box for years, he only really takes it out to clean and oil it. I just took it home with me and wanted to take it to the range, but wanted to learn a little more about it before I start taking it with me.

It says "22 Long Rifle CTG" on one side of the barrel
"Smith & Wesson" on the other side of the barrel
serial # is K380304
it says "M00-17" under the serial number on the frame when the cylinder is pushed out

Please excuse me if I don't use proper gun component terms, I'm not a gunsmith. Feel free to educate me!

I just want to know the year it was made and anything you can tell me about this firearm. Thank you very much!


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Welcome to the forum,

The serial number is the K380304. the stamping on the crane that you see when the cylinder is swung out is MOD 17, meaning Model 17. Since there is no number after the Mod 17, we call it a "Model 17 No dash." That happens to make it one of the earliest version of this highly prized revolver models.
You have what's known as a K-22 Masterpiece. It was built and shipped from the factory in early 1959.
It looks to be in pretty good condition. Your revolver is one of the finest small caliber target revolvers ever produced.

It will easily hit a 4" target out to 50 yds with a little work from the shooter. With one of mine I was able to set 6 bullets on a standard sheet of paper at 100 yds, from a simple rest position. These K-22's are a sheer pleasure to shoot and handle. I hope you'll keep it for many years to come.
I've now got my 3rd one (I sold the other 2), and I've finally gotten smart enough to know I won't be parting with it. Once you have one of these and you learn to shoot it, it'll become part of your regular range sessions. It's prefect of rlearning how to shoot quickly, accurately or both without breaking the bank.

In that condition it could easily fetch $650-750 just the way it is out here in Idaho, even without the original box or othere stuff that originally came with it. You've got something pretty special in your possession. Please take good care of it.

Regards,
Gearchecker
 
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Wow thank you so much for the reply! I knew I had something special when I saw it, the gun is beautiful. I'm really looking forward to firing it but I want to keep it in great condition so I'm glad I checked here first. I have no intentions on selling it, i love the history and the fact it's been in my family so long. I never cleaned a gun with that type of finish before, do you have a product suggestion so I keep the finish looking like new? Thanks again!
 

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welcome01 To the forum from SE Indiana. What Gearchecker said. I had one back in the early 70s and traded it for a shotgun. I really lost my but on that one but didn't find out how bad until some 30 years later. That is a prize and family heirloom so hold on to it. As for cleaning...here's what I use on my old Ruger single sixes. CLP and a Bore Snake. Hang around and have some fun . goodjob01 Best regards Dick
 

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Hello and welcome from east Ky. I dont know much about guns, but it's a good looking weapon!! As for cleaning it, I just use gun oil, or three in one oil and a cotton rag.(like an old t-shirt)nugfaong
 

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welcome01 to the forum from the Wiregrass! Very nice K22 Masterpiece. Here's mine from 1948:



Asking about gun cleaning, lubrication and protection (CLP) is like asking about women (or, for our lady members-men). Everybody has a different opinion about the most appealing ones. Just about any of the current cleaning products will work and won't hurt the finish on your K22. I have made my own CLP from a formula called Ed's Red Gun Bore Cleaner (just Google it). It makes a large quantity of CLP and is relatively inexpensive compared to the packaged products. If you plan on shooting a lot, I recommend it for being the least expensive. I also use a dry lubricant called Strike Hold that bonds with the metal and is hydrophobic. Water won't penetrate it and it rejects carbon as well. Cleaning is relegated to wiping down the gun with a cotton cloth and running a patch soaked in Strike Hold through the barrel. Done. It won't deal with leading, though, so you might find it useful to get a lead removal cloth to "get the lead out." Also, for best effectiveness with Strike Hold, you need to remove the sideplate, clean out the oil and coat the action. Doing that may make you uneasy, so you can spray it into the side plate through the trigger and hammer openings and let it drip and dry if you want.

Also, you might want to take it out of the box and put it in a silicone sock or gun rug for storage. Enjoy!!
 
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Welcome to the forum from the peach state. That is a very nice wheel gun. Hope you enjoy visiting the forum as much as I do. Great bunch of Gals and the Guys are okay too.
 

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Thanks for all the replies! I'm looking at the cleaning products now and I'm defiantly going to get a silicone sock for storage. My dad always used the old gun oil and a t-shirt (which kept her looking just fine) but I plan on shooting her and want to make sure she stays looking fine. :) Looking forward to being part of the forum! I've got 2 other S&Ws so I look forward to sharing stories and asking questions.
 

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Hi neighbor, and welcome. As to cleaning your .22, always be mindful of your cleaning rod dragging against the muzzle ( the end you don't stand in front of.) Some rods are steel, and will ruin the crown of the muzzle destroying accuracy. Also use a cleaning patch sized to your revolver. They come already sized...like .22 and .38 and .45 etc....Or you can make your own out of old cotton tshirts and the like. Now that is real re-cycling.The Bore Snake is a good product, it comes in differant sizes to match your gun caliber. I use them on .22 and .223 caliber rifles and handguns alot because that itty bitty barrel can be a bear to pull a cleaning patch thru. About silicone socks and such, they repel moisture, but also trap it inside too. So always be sure it is dry before you use one. Your Dad was smart to use soft cotton to wrap it in. It protected your .22 and also let air flow. You have a valuable family heirloom that will last for many more generations with good care. One last thing, if you have little or no experience with firearms, please take a "Basic Pistol Course" gun safety course from the NRA. You will learn the proper care and operation of this marvelous invention, and will not regret it. Hard8
 
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