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I'd like to see more detail. It shares characteristics of the twenties and thirties, may be transitional or assembled from parts. No collector value. Practical value? Restoration, absolutely not. About the best solution is go to the auto parts store, get a can of Mother's Mag Polish. Remove those Franzite (replacement) Grips and rub it down to a combination of nickel and bare metal. That will take a while.

If the bore survives there may be a shooter hiding in there. At 4 million plus and counting it would be cheaper to by a used M&P than restore one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'd like to see more detail. It shares characteristics of the twenties and thirties, may be transitional or assembled from parts. No collector value. Practical value? Restoration, absolutely not. About the best solution is go to the auto parts store, get a can of Mother's Mag Polish. Remove those Franzite (replacement) Grips and rub it down to a combination of nickel and bare metal. That will take a while.

If the bore survives there may be a shooter hiding in there. At 4 million plus and counting it would be cheaper to by a used M&P than restore one.
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Cliff I tend to think a crease in the plating.

The rear sight seems to be of the squared off type. The ejector rod end is of the late twenties thru WWII barrel shape. The small trademark on the right was changed, when? Given the conventional wisdom that 500,000 dates to 1927, I am calling it late twenties transitional. OP that means little there are so many "transitional" periods in the myriad engineering changes that have taken place. If the serial under the barrel matches and there is an N there as well I believe it is an original gun (less grips) and wears its original finish.

Scrubbing that patina down to white metal will not be the equivalent of a face lift but it will not assault the eyes to the current degree. Restoring a nickel gun is not simply running down to the hubcap shop. I stand by my earlier comments.

With a fair tail wind it might top $200 in my area. A set of nickel medallion grips will run $75-$100 easily etc., etc.
 

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It is a badly flaked nickeled M&P from early 1929; nothing transitional, all features are correct. Logo on the correct side (1920 to 1937), barrel shaped ejector rod (since 1927). Unless it has a B on the underbarrel flat next to the serial, the nickel is original; the N was not generally used pre-war and just the absence of the B confirms nickel.

As for value and possible restoration, I agree with what's been said already; no collector value left, so anything you do to it can't ruin anything, but make sure you do what improves the gun in your eyes; you won't ever be able to recoup any money you put into it by increasing its resale value enough.
 
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