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I picked up this Type 14 today after a bit of negotiation. I have been taking an interest in Japanese weapons lately and was looking to get a small trigger guard T14 to go with my 1941 vintage Nambu.

This one is in pretty good condition with very light freckling on the frame and has all matching numbers except for the magazine. Made at the Chigusa branch of the Nagoya Arsenal and dated 7.7 (Showa calendar), it was manufactured in July, 1932. Of the three Nagoya Arsenal-affiliated producers of Type 14 pistols, Chigusa, had the smallest production total and was the very first manufacturer of Type 14 pistols. Total productio was only about 7,800 pistols. It is identified by it's use of the Nagoya Arsenal symbol alone.







Shown with my 16.3 (March 1941) dated Type 14 for comparison.
 

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The ... uh ... inspiration for the Ruger mk1.
Correctomundo. There's quite a story behind it. Sam Colt took home a Type 14 as a souvenir from the Revolutionary War. Not knowing what to do with it he gave the thing to John Browning. Being the amateur that he was, Browning couldn't help so he turned it over to Black Jack Pershing. BJ took it overseas to fight the Aussies, and upon returning to the states he gave it to Bill Ruger. And as they say, the rest is history. :rolleyes:
JK
That's not quite true. As the real story goes, Bill Ruger got a couple of Nambus from a marine returning home from WW2 and used it as the inspiration for his first pistol, the Ruger Standard. The Standard was the first in the line of the MK pistols. :)

Sent from my Commodore 64 running Windoze 95
 
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