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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok new on the forum and I'am here because the blue book is very confusing. the right side barrel reads 44 S&W special CTG the right side has nothing on the frame but a B by the grip pin. the left side has the Smith and Wesson on the barrel and trade mark logo on the frame, and a N at the grip pin. the number on the bottom of the grip is 193xx same number under the barrel and cylinder. The number under the crane on the frame is 51335. do i have a 1917 model or a .44 DA model. just trying to date it.
 

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They were making 44 S&W Specials since 1907-8. But without images, we are merely guessing.

Read this and try again if you want answers.


Kevin
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Having trouble getting pick to post so info I did not put on the original post were 6 1/2 barrel and a 5 screw four on the side one on the trigger guard. fixed front sight.
 

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Here's my WAG. Serial 193xx in 44 Special seems to conform to a 2nd Model 44 Hand Ejector, as described in the Standard Catalog of S&W on page186. The number on the butt, 193xx, should also be on the cylinder face, and the bottom of the barrel flat. There is probably a lanyard ring on the butt, or a hole that one would mount in. Target sights on these are hard to find, but they are out there. (In every private collection except mine, LOL) So, take a picture of the left and right sides with your phone, and upload them using the handy tool box to see how bad I'm wrong. Best of luck to you.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! You have a .44 Hand Ejector, 2nd Model from 1922 before S&W began stamping "Made in USA" on the lower right side frame.
 
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Very nice. Should be a great shooter. You can get that upper side plate screw from Numrich Gun Parts, and a bunch of other retailers, for just a couple bucks. Lanyard rings are available as well, if you want one. 2nd Model 44's in condition similar to yours are selling in the $600-$850 range, but I haven't done much research on this model. Good luck!
 

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I know aebel69 didn't mean to confuse, but the term "upper sideplate screw" usually applies to the large screw up at the top of the sideplate near the front of the hammer. There are two types of rear screws: domed and flat. Either will work but your gun used a domed screw because the grips in that era didn't cover the screw head. Around 1950, S&W went to a flat headed screw so they didn't have to dimple the right grip panel of the magna grips so the panel would lie flat against the sideplate.
 

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Hey D,

Welcome to S&W!!

Way to go!

Pics of a great TRIPLELOCK right out the gate!!

They are excellent revolvers!

Later, Mark
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Would love to shoot it cylinder gap came out at .011 pull came out at 3 1/2 lbs. very smooth i love it. But do i need a light load? and what brand and type?
 

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Pics of a great TRIPLELOCK right out the gate!!
It's not a triplelock, Mark. (.44 HE, 1st Model) S&W quit making them in 1915 after the Brits complained they were too precisely engineered to survive a trench war.

Would love to shoot it cylinder gap came out at .011 pull came out at 3 1/2 lbs. very smooth i love it. But do i need a light load? and what brand and type?
Not too bad. You should use end shake bearings to reduce the B2C gap to between .004-.010, but it should fire fine at .011 as long as it indexes and locks up tight. Cowboy loads of .44 Special should work fine. I got mine from Georgia Arms. But, any cartridge with lead bullet should work fine.
 
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It's not a triplelock, Mark. (.44 HE, 1st Model) S&W quit making them in 1915 after the Brits complained they were too precisely engineered to survive a trench war.


Not too bad. You should use end shake bearings to reduce the B2C gap to between .004-.010, but it should fire fine at .011 as long as it indexes and locks up tight. Cowboy loads of .44 Special should work fine. I got mine from Georgia Arms. But, any cartridge with lead bullet should work fine.
Thanks!

Still a super Fine 44! (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The silver medallion grips are from the 1930-40 decade. Original grips would not have the medallions. My .44 HE/2nd wears grips from the 1910-20 decade.

Hi Guy so mine are silver 30s to40s, yours are gold 10s to 20s, mine dates 1922 it would have the same grips but no medallion? The ones on mine are a little small for the frame. can the wood shrink some?
 

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Can the wood shrink? Technically, yes. But, S&W fit the Service stocks and the Magna stocks to each individual revolver. Stocks were selected and attached to the revolver. A fitter took the frame to a belt sander and shaped the stocks AND the frame at the same time. When satisfied, the stocks came off and were numbered to the revolver.

So, the pair you have most likely are from a different revolver.

Kevin
 

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it would have the same grips but no medallion? The ones on mine are a little small for the frame. can the wood shrink some?
The grips would look like these that are on a .38 M&P Target...but, would be N frame size.


There is no advantage to changing them out as far as shooting goes. Plus, the medallion grips are better looking, IMO. In this era, the grips were all hand fitted to the frame. It is possible the gun they were on originally had some variations in the frame. Wood can shrink but typically doesn't on these guns. It is also possible they are K frame size. What is the serial number stamped on the back of the right panel?
 
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