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Discussion Starter #1
This Blunderbuss hung over our fireplace in the house I grew up in. It was there since I was born and, like many things that are just there, I paid little attention to it. When I began to acquire an interest in firearms, I asked my dad about the flintlock over the fireplace.

My dad said that someone put five guns on consignment back in the 1950's at Marshall Field & Company where my grandfather was the gun buyer. This one didn't sell so the owner said Fields could just keep it. When my mom and dad moved out of their apartment in Chicago and into a house in the suburbs, my grandfather said to my dad, "Hey, your new house has a fireplace, doesn't it? Get this thing out of my display case and hang it over your fireplace!"

When I was in high school, my dad and I took it to a fancy gun show but no one could provide any info on it. Too bad there wasn't an Antiques Roadshow back then.

When my wife and I built our new home after we got married, my parents had retired to Wisconsin. My dad said to me, "Hey, your new house has a fireplace, doesn't it?"

So it's been displayed over our fireplace ever since.



With the advent of the internet, I put some photos up on the Antique Guns website nine years ago. A rather knowledgable gentleman emailed me with all the info I could ever ask for about the blunderbuss.

The barrel makers mark of HK under a fleur de lys is that of Henry Kirby who was an apprentice to Humphrey Pye and transferred to Robert Herring in 1677. He began making his own firearms in 1689 and he died in 1722.

The other two marks on the barrel are the proof and view marks of the Gunmakers' Company of London. The name on the barrel is that of Thomas Brackley who made the gun by hand with the Kirby barrel. Brackley apprenticed to Ralph Stringer in the Gunmakers' Company in 1702 and this blunderbuss was made some time right after that.



So it's around 300 years old and in outstanding condition for its age.

The flint still sparks and I keep oil on the stock so it won't dry out. Now that's what I call a big bore....



-Steve
 

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Kind of reminds me of the HD pump shotguns we all know well. I wonder if thats what this sort of thing was made for?
I would suggest Amoskeag or Levine auctions might be able to shed some light, maybe someone at Old Town Station too.
 

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What LeMat just said...very cool. You need to get a pirate flag for the background and a pair of crossed cutless swords to go with it. Cold Steel makes a decent repo sword.
 

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Did I miss it,or did you post its value.I would love to know as that is one of THE oldeast privately owned pieces in THAT shape that I have seen.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have no idea what it's value would be.... I do like how it looks above my fireplace though. It's been a part of my life for 43 years so far. Maybe our daughter will have a fireplace one day.
 
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