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I just thought I'd post pics of my June 1944 Springfield M1 Garand. I love my 19-3 but this is the rifle I sold my soul for.:D No, she's not a wall hanger - she's a shooter! When I can find ammo, that is. I just looked on Midway and they have it back in stock. Gotta pay off my property taxes first though!:mad: If anyone needs help dating their Garand, let me know - I have a few books. Enjoy these pics!
 

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Go to SGammo.com, and look for the Greek HXP ammo.
You can find ammo for less money on gunbroker.com and SGammo than you'll find it in most other places on the net.
Do not shoot regular off the shelf 30-06 ammo thru it. Use only 30-06 ammo made to the military specs.
It is slightly lower pressure, and has gunpowder with the correct burn rate, so it doesn't mess up your rifle, and especially so it won't bend the rifles guide rod.

Enjoy yours in good health.
Here's mine: The receiver dates to March 1941.
View attachment 331059 100_1372.JPG
 

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Beautiful rifle. Understand paying for what one wants, whether it is a S&W or a Garand, 03/03-A3, KAR-98, etc.

On ammo, install a Schuster gas plug. Follow directions. You will have no problems. I use HXP and have no problems. For hunting, the Schuster is the way to go. Allows one to safely shoot common commercial .30-06 ammo for hunting w/o any risk to the operating system of the rifle. Issue is not that the ammo is to high a pressure. Issue is that the gas pressure at the gas port is to high over energizing the gas system/op rod. Sincerely. bruce.
 

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If I ever get a Garand M1, I will have settle for a connection with 1947 with a barrel of that date.

On the other hand, I could easily settle for one manufactured on June 6, 1944, May 8, 1945, or September 2, 1945.
 

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I purchased my M1 Garand from the DCM back in 1983 when I was shooting in our club's military matches. It numbers to March 1945.
What Bruce said about the Schuster Plug. The Garand was designed to operate on a certain pressure curve for the operating rod..bend
one and it can get quite expensive. Ammo was dirt cheap back in the day and it wasn't uncommon for a couple of guys to put their money
together and order as much as they could afford. I still have more than I'll ever need so I never had to reload for my M1. I have a soft spot
in my heart for the old military arms and the history that comes with them. I had some good pics but lost them when my computer crashed
several years ago. I'll post what I have which is me shooting mine and the M1 field stripped for cleaning. Stay safe my friends Dick

100_1343.jpg
100_1270.jpg
 

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I'm curious, what year and manufacturer is stamped on the barrel of your Garand?
Mine was rebarreled at CMP, and is new production dated 2011
 

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Mine is 11/43. Mine shows a lot of use, I would love to know the story behind it but has been lost now, the chain is broken. It has not been fired in 30 plus years or more. I would like to think it helped win the war, it sure looks like it.

I love these things. Very happy for those that found mint ones.
 

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Did someone say M1 Garand?

Here's a six digit sn Springfield with a 1943 barrel...

DSC1751_NoSerial.jpg
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DSC1776.jpg

This one originally had a grenade launcher sight mounted on it, and is loose enough to have seen a fair amount of service in WW-II and after.
 
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