Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!
First off... great forum, congratulations to all for such awesome work!

This revolver belonged to my great grandfather.
After reading over many of the Q&As in this forum and doing some research(a), I was able to gather this information.

I did my best with the pictures but that nickel finish sure knows how to make it harder to focus!
I welcome any corrections or additions to my findings.

Thanks!
~South34~

(a) Standard Catalog of Smith&Wesson 3rd Edition (Jannuary 3, 2007). Jim Supica & Richard Nahas. ISBN-13 978-0896892934

Model:

Model: .32-20 Hand Ejector Model of 1905, 4th Change from 1915
Frame: Square butt K frame with five screws
Caliber: .32-20 Winchester
Cylinder: Heat treated 6-shot fluted with a nominal length of 1.56”
Finish: Nickel plated
Grip: Original checked diamond walnut stocks without medallions
Barrel: 4" Nickel Plated with “32 W.C.F. CTG” on the right side, “Smith & Wesson” on the left side
Sights: Front Blade with Rear Open Fixed Groove
Trigger: Factory .265” checked hammer spur
Weight: 30 oz
Manufactured: 1915 ~ 1940

Unit:

Serial numbers found on the butt, cylinder face, behind the star extractor, on the yoke and on the barrel flat
Serial # butt: 110xxx
Serial # cylinder face: 110xxx
Serial # behind the star extractor: 110xxx
Serial # yoke: 30xxx

Unit pictures:
503459


503460


503461


503462


503464


503465


503466


503467


503468
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,775 Posts
Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! That's gorgeous! Has it ever been fired? BTW, from the markings on the gun it was made between 1922 and 1930. All of the .32-20 Hand Ejectors were made by 1930 and discontinued. S&W sold them out of inventory until 1940.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,219 Posts
Wow. That's as close to NIB as you'll find. That would get some serious drooling at the larger auction houses.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Cliff

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The number you refer to on the yoke is a fitters number and has no meaning outside the factory. Beautiful gun/box, etc. And priceless too! Thanks for sharing it with us.
Thank you for that information. I wonder what information was associated with that number. Gunsmith? Batch# and location?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! That's gorgeous! Has it ever been fired? BTW, from the markings on the gun it was made between 1922 and 1930. All of the .32-20 Hand Ejectors were made by 1930 and discontinued. S&W sold them out of inventory until 1940.
Thank you for the info!
"Has it ever been fired?" : I know this one has exactly 6 shots in it, no more, no less. So although I can't claim it is 100% new, it's almost there.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
35,654 Posts
Welcome to the forum!

Fine looking revolver that you have there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Hello everyone!
First off... great forum, congratulations to all for such awesome work!

This revolver belonged to my great grandfather.
After reading over many of the Q&As in this forum and doing some research(a), I was able to gather this information.

I did my best with the pictures but that nickel finish sure knows how to make it harder to focus!
I welcome any corrections or additions to my findings.

Thanks!
~South34~

(a) Standard Catalog of Smith&Wesson 3rd Edition (Jannuary 3, 2007). Jim Supica & Richard Nahas. ISBN-13 978-0896892934

Model:

Model: .32-20 Hand Ejector Model of 1905, 4th Change from 1915
Frame: Square butt K frame with five screws
Caliber: .32-20 Winchester
Cylinder: Heat treated 6-shot fluted with a nominal length of 1.56”
Finish: Nickel plated
Grip: Original checked diamond walnut stocks without medallions
Barrel: 4" Nickel Plated with “32 W.C.F. CTG” on the right side, “Smith & Wesson” on the left side
Sights: Front Blade with Rear Open Fixed Groove
Trigger: Factory .265” checked hammer spur
Weight: 30 oz
Manufactured: 1915 ~ 1940

Unit:

Serial numbers found on the butt, cylinder face, behind the star extractor, on the yoke and on the barrel flat
Serial # butt: 110xxx
Serial # cylinder face: 110xxx
Serial # behind the star extractor: 110xxx
Serial # yoke: 30xxx

Unit pictures:
View attachment 503459

View attachment 503460

View attachment 503461

View attachment 503462

View attachment 503464

View attachment 503465

View attachment 503466

View attachment 503467

View attachment 503468
Question from a newbie: What is the purpose or concern for blurring your serial number?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Question from a newbie: What is the purpose or concern for blurring your serial number?
First of, I am a newbie here too, so this was just my experience.

After going over posts and seeing many others do this I asked myself I different question:
Do other members need the full number? And it seemed like they didn´t.
As I read in many posts, it is required so other members can help identify or date a gun, and in some cases (like this revolver) the first 3 digits where enough.
So even though I am not aware of how fraudsters may act, I thought is was a sensible thing to do and took nothing away from others in the forum. That is why I tried to blur them in a way it didn´t ruin the picture.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top