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Discussion Starter #1
I've put just under 300 rounds through my model 29 "Classic" and never had an issue. Last range visit it died on me. A vertical crack extends from the forcing cone to about 2" down the barrel. The crack originated in perfect alignment with two corners of roughly opposing groves and follows them. Where the barrel is threaded into the gun, the frame let go. The section of the barrel on the left side was totally blown off, I didn't find it. For those of you that know more about the metallurgy of these guns and how they fail......what the hell happened? The cylinder's fine, the brass I pulled out no problem with my fingernails. Oh, and there were no injuries.

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There is currently a thread on the other forum with much the same issue but more severe. The other owner was thinking double charge in his reloaded ammo but now maybe not.
 

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Please tell me you were using factory ammo, in which case S&W will replace your gun. It's possible there was a squib then the pressure of the next round caused the failure... however w/ a .44 magnum it's doubtful you wouldn't have noticed the low recoil of a squib. I'd contact S&W.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There was no squib. It's shocking to see how little metal there is just underneath the barrel, where it threads in. Perhaps 1/16"
 

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There was no squib. It's shocking to see how little metal there is just underneath the barrel, where it threads in. Perhaps 1/16"


The barrel should be enough to contain the pressure, although the frame adds some strength. The warped metal of the barrel appears to have ruptured upwards just in front of the threads... & when things let go problems tend to multiply. I doubt it was an overcharge or the cylinder would have ruptured instead of the barrel. I think a flaw in the barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I found the missing part of the frame, it was on the ground 7 feet to my front left. It blew from the top down. My frame was cracked, that was the initial point of failure. Little bits of powder coat residue in only the first part of the crack. Why today the rest went, who knows, but it appears also that there may have been an inclusion in the steel itself.
 

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You shot it w/ a cracked frame? :eek:
 

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Cracked frame from an over tightened barrel? Seen it happen before.Not too hot a load or the cylinder would have blown. My guess is S&W will thumb their nose cuz it was a handload
 

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Sucks!! Sorry to see that, if you don't mind keep us in the loop on how Smith and Wesson respond. Thanks and again sorry
 

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I started wondering about my model 10-15 classic after I read this thread. The blueing is getting lighter and lighter at the rear 1 1/2' of the barrel on both sides and the first half inch of the frame on both sides. I am using a much lighter load than factory. I load 5.2 grains of Trailboss with a 205 grain lead round nose bullet. My loads usually chronograph around 800 fps. I have never shot anything hotter than that in this gun, and yet the blueing keeps getting lighter in those areas. Do you think I am experiencing metal fatigue? Should I worry about this? I would contact S&W about it, but I know the first thing they would ask is if I am shooting hand loads.
 

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I started wondering about my model 10-15 classic after I read this thread. The blueing is getting lighter and lighter at the rear 1 1/2' of the barrel on both sides and the first half inch of the frame on both sides. I am using a much lighter load than factory. I load 5.2 grains of Trailboss with a 205 grain lead round nose bullet. My loads usually chronograph around 800 fps. I have never shot anything hotter than that in this gun, and yet the blueing keeps getting lighter in those areas. Do you think I am experiencing metal fatigue? Should I worry about this? I would contact S&W about it, but I know the first thing they would ask is if I am shooting hand loads.


Blueing loss isn't a sign of metal fatigue.
 
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Bottom line here is you are gonna have to fib to the Mothership or they will tell you to pound the pud. They will not under any circumstances warranty a handgun using handloads. Well, almost never I better say.
 

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You should pull the cylinder and measure the diameter across each pair of chambers. I have in my possession a cylinder from a Model 629 that has a bulged chamber, rather obviously from an overload. The bulge is not delectable by casual visual examination. Once the bulged chamber is identified, it is fairly easy to see. But anyone who picks up the cylinder wouldn't notice the bulge.
 

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Sorry, my brain is leaking these days. Let's start over again.
What I have is a Model 25-15 in .45 Long Colt caliber.
I guess what I am worried about is that if the metal is not up to par, the blueing is fading because of the metal heating up too much when it is fired.
I am interested to hear more about cleaning powder or lead residue from the blueing. I use M-pro 7 cleaner on the inside and outside of my guns. Is there a stronger outside cleaner that won't hurt the blueing?
 
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