Smith And Wesson Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Pedersoli has seen fit to make available a Mortimer Flintlock. This particular one is a .54 Cal in a target configuration. They have replicated perhaps one of the most refined Flintlock lockworks to include the detailing of the fine English originals. Even to include a half-cock safety. The barrel is high luster brown instead of being blued. The target sights are as found in original match guns. The stock has a bit of off cast and is shotgun style in the English fashion. The wood on this particular one is pleasing ;) ....





giz
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,955 Posts
The grain in that wood is outstanding, along with the browning it realy stands out.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
xtm,

It is every bit the finest Pedersoli Flintlock they have made. You have to see the backside of the lock mechanism... The fancy late flint lock, circa 1810 - 1820, is color hardened, and marked MORTIMER. It features an anti-friction roller frizzen spring. The pan is free standing, surrounded by grooves to drain away rain from your priming. This design is sometimes called a waterproof pan. The cock is re-enforced with support on both sides of the top jaw screw, sometimes called a double throated cock. This is a very conservative design feature, and these are late flint features. The lock also has the original Mortimer half-cock safety....the rarely replicated sliding safety. Manually engaged at half cock, it adds another layer of safety to the normally secure half-cock safety notch. It automatically retracts when the hammer is pulled to full cock, and does not impede the hunter's quick shot.

The vent liner has optimum vent geometry. This vent is a perfect window to transmit the heat of the flash directly into the main charge. This removable vent allows easy cleaning.


And that is just the lock :mrgreen:

giz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
I have seen that half-cock sliding safety called a "stalking safety" in 19th century print. I'm delighted to see that it was done in the proper manner. Many English rifles had them, but most were just sliding catches that you had to manually engage and disengage --- a real PITA in a dicey situation.

Is this a slug gun - and is the bullet weight and regulated powder charge engraved somewhere on the rifle?

xtm
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
It is a round ball gun. The Mortimer markings are on the lockworks and carries only the serial number...and no other markings. The 36" long octagon-to-round .54 caliber barrel is highly polished and finished to a high gloss chocolate brown. The transition is apparent by a wedding band at the point of transition. A special patent hooked breech and tang allow the barrel to lift out easily for cleaning after use.

I'm looking into the Shotgun barrel to add to this gun, as it is more typical of the Mortimer and Pedersoli has made this available in the past... The two captured wedge keys retain the barrel. (They cannot be lost in the field.) Remove the ramrod, withdraw the keys, and the barrel can be dismounted for easy cleaning. So I'm hopeful that this gun's shotgun barrel will interchange into the rifled barreled inletting...wish me luck :mrgreen:
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top