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Give me your thoughts here...I use Honda moly lube on the splines of my BMW R1200RT motorcycle as a "high temp, high pressure spline lube." It is supposed to be one of the best lubes available, and the price reflects it.

I wonder if it would help smooth out the insides or a S&W revolver (trigger return slide, hammer, etc). Anyone tried this? I need the wisdom of the experienced folks here. Perhaps it would be a disaster.

I am resisting the urge to try it until I hear what those in the know here think. Also, I hope I am not reviving a very dead topic.
 

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Why not just use gun oil for what it was made for? I've used Hoppes for over 40 years on rifles, shotgun, revolvers, autos w/ zero problems.
 

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I'd think spline grease would be too viscous. Stick with low viscosity gun oil on revolver internals.
 

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Gun firearms oils are made to use over a wide range of temperatures . From below zero to high temps . Viscosity must be constant in firearms . Every body has heard of the fire pin freezing using the wrong gun oil on the rifle in cold weather causing a sluggish firing pin and a light primer hit . Most greases will not work well on firearms and cause problems with fine lock work. I think your Honda Lube would not work well and may cause you some problems ..

I'd stick with regular tried and true gun oils and use then very sparingly .
 

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I have used “Dri-Slide” on the internal works of my revolvers for 40 years. Good stuff.
 

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Most greases will not work well on firearms and cause problems with fine lock work.
That may be true of "most greases," including this Honda product, but it's not true of the formula commonly called "red grease," as sold under the Shooter's Choice brand, & no doubt others. THIS product--which I've been using for at least 20 yrs--works wonderfully well on firearms, including such critical interfaces as the sear & hammer notch, at least within more or less "normal" temperature ranges, which excludes artic conditions. Is it possible to pack it in so tightly that problems may ensue? There's no good product that can't be misused by a fool.

There are few ordinary gun oils, on the other hand, that don't eventually oxidize--that is, turn gummy & sticky.
 

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Gun lubricants are engineered to also have properties that help preserve metal from corrosion.

The lubricants for guns need to be hydrophobic - water repellent. Some greases are blended with lithium soaps, creating greases that attract and try and contain water.

Generally, thicker lubricants like greases are used on metal surfaces that are in sliding contact. When things wipe against each other, they get a grease.

Where parts rotate, thinner preserving oils are generally used.

I don't know what's in the grease you mention - but before you attempt to use it on a firearm, you need to find out details of it's components.
 
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