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I've got a safe full of S&Ws but, the only one with the firing pin in the frame is the John Ross .500m how about you?
Steve
 

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Had a gorgeous .44 Special Thunder Road w/ the frame mounted firing pin. Lousy thing just wouldn't do anything at all but sit there and set off primers when I pulled the trigger! Would not even give me the satisfaction of breaking when I was doing dry-fire practice, etc. Just sat there ... in the frame. Now, the frame mounted firing pin is not new. I've had one or more .22 LR S&W revolvers since about 1983. They've all had that nifty little frame mounted firing pin. It never occurred to me that they would ever use it with centerfire calibers. Oh well, it happened. Now, I've got all these little spare "hammer noses" for my revolvers. What to do with them? Wind chimes? Possibly. Borrow some of the little crystal glasses that my wife keeps in a cabinet. We'll see! Sincerely. bruce.
 

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I missed out on an early 686, a dash 1 if I remember right. It was a 4 incher, and it came into my friends gun shop a few years ago.
It bummed me out that I thought it over one day too long.
Ended up buying a new 686, in a 6 inch barrel, from him, with the frame mounted firing pin, and even a Hilary hole..
Hurts my pride a bit to look at it, but its never missed a lick, and it even has a pretty good trigger pull.

I am not disappointed, at all, and I like to shoot it. Oh... maybe one thing the ugly rubber grips had to go, and the round butt was a little hard to get a grip set that I liked. They would have made it a lot easier on me, if they would have just made it a square butt.
 
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I used to have a Model 17-? and a Model 34-?, missed out on the Model 53, but currently have several of the Model 22-4 revolvers. All have frame mounted FPs. S&W has been using them for decades. Is this somehow a big deal?

Kevin
 

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I used to have a Model 17-? and a Model 34-?, missed out on the Model 53, but currently have several of the Model 22-4 revolvers. All have frame mounted FPs. S&W has been using them for decades. Is this somehow a big deal?

Kevin
Not really. The floating pins don't require quite as much hand fitting work, and they are a part of the evolution of manufacturing changes made to streamline the production process. The hammer nose like I posted, has a tiny spring buried behind it in the hammer that allows the nose to return to a certain position when the hammer is cocked, and allows the nose to change its angle as it fits into the hammer nose bushing when the hammer drops, which is in the same spot as the floating pin on newer guns. The nose is more apt to get bent or broken, or the spring gums up and the nose sticks, and then wears the hole in the bushing out of round if the gun isn't properly maintained. That can cause potential misfires as the wear increases, because the nose strikes the primer off-center. However, it is a characteristic that extends back into antiquity that collectors of the classic guns like (much like pinned barrels and recessed chambers), and is very distinctive to see when the gun is cocked. As long as the owner stays on top of the gun's condition, it's not a problem.

I should have said "all but one" of my S&W's have the hammer nose. My M48-4 has the floating pin and always has, since it is a rimfire revolver.
 

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Not really. The floating pins don't require quite as much hand fitting work, and they are a part of the evolution of manufacturing changes made to streamline the production process. The hammer nose like I posted, has a tiny spring buried behind it in the hammer that allows the nose to return to a certain position when the hammer is cocked, and allows the nose to change its angle as it fits into the hammer nose bushing when the hammer drops, which is in the same spot as the floating pin on newer guns. The nose is more apt to get bent or broken, or the spring gums up and the nose sticks, and then wears the hole in the bushing out of round if the gun isn't properly maintained. That can cause potential misfires as the wear increases, because the nose strikes the primer off-center. However, it is a characteristic that extends back into antiquity that collectors of the classic guns like (much like pinned barrels and recessed chambers), and is very distinctive to see when the gun is cocked. As long as the owner stays on top of the gun's condition, it's not a problem.

I should have said "all but one" of my S&W's have the hammer nose. My M48-4 has the floating pin and always has, since it is a rimfire revolver.
I have S&W revolvers from the 1860 up to this century. Never understood the phobia with the frame mounted firing pins. S&W has been using them for decades. Heck, Colts has been using them from the 1870s!

Kevin
 
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