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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Apologies in advance, I searched the forum before posting this but didn't find anything exactly on topic.

I own a pretty new Model 66; I've put only about 600 rounds through it. I clean it thoroughly each time I fire it. Now I've found that if it sits for a few days, the cylinder starts to stick. By this I mean that when the cylinder is swung clear of the frame, it won't turn without applying some force to it. You can feel it bind up, then if you force it to turn it will squeak and slowly loosen up. It seems pretty straightforward that something is rusting or corroded in some way on the cylinder rod, although I suppose it might be something else.

My main question is, should I send this back to S&W? They've offered to take a look at it under warranty, but it will take 6-8 weeks. Or is this an easy fix for a gunsmith? Any thoughts about what exactly causes this in a new firearm? I'm not a new gun owner, exactly, but a "first time in a long time" owner, so have limited experience. I suppose I can just take it to a local gunsmith and see what they say, but I like to have as much info as I can in advance in situations like this. Thanks for any thoughts!
 

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It is probably nothing more than gunk in the space between the extractor rod and cylinder. If you are familiar with taking a S&W apart then screw the extractor rod out of the cylinder and clean it good. If you don’t want to do that spray some break free in the space and let it soak overnight. BYW. The extractor rod is reverse threaded if you want to take it out. If you don’t want to try either of those options I would send it back to S&W.
 

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It's not too difficult to check what's going on if you're careful.

The cylinder yoke is held in place by a forward screw that also holds the action's side plate in place. You don't have to remove the side plate or all of the side plate screws, just the one toward the front above the trigger guard.

When the cylinder is swung out, this should allow you to slide the yoke out of the frame and inspect it and the screw's end for galling or accumulation of grease or dirt.

It's essential to use the exact correct screwdriver tip so that you don't bugger the screw slot or the frame around it.

See this video about 5min in... Remember, only the front screw has to be removed to get the yoke out. Don't pull them all and remove the side plate.


If it is junk in the ejector rod mechanism you can try soaking just the cylinder and yoke assembly. It also lets you get to it all more easily. The ejector assembly can be unscrewed, but you need the right tools and need to know the correct direction to unscrew it or you'll bugger it all up. There is a spring in there that may be binding. For that, get it to someone with experience taking the cylinder and yoke apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK, great, thank you for these replies! I"m not very comfortable taking the pistol apart myself, but this gives me a good idea of what is going on. Sounds like an easy fix for an experienced gunsmith. I'm willing to pay a reasonable amount of money for a local repair, to avoid the hassle of sending it back to S&W. Thank you both again!
 

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Welcome to The Forum from the Wiregrass! Wait! Don't take it to a gunsmith yet. This is a simple take down of the revolver for cleaning. You should know how to do this and never have to take it to a gunsmith. Just follow the advice of Marc and the video and you will be fine. I suggest getting some FrogLube and when you take the cylinder and yoke out of the frame, put a light coating of FrogLube on the Yoke stem. Then reassemble it. It takes all of five minutes and it's not hard. Again if you're going to shoot this gun, you need to know how to clean it. You can't take it to a gunsmith every time it needs to be cleaned.

Guy
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess my question is whether having this happen on such a new gun suggests a manufacturing defect that should concern me?
 

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You need to break it down and lube it. And then if it still has stiffness in the hinge area which is called the yoke, then you can call Smith & Wesson and see if they want you to return it. Don't be afraid of it. It's simply a tool and a fairly simple one at that. Taking the cylinder off to clean it is a standard procedure. You need to know how to do that. We will help you. It's not very hard.

Guy
 

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In my opinion, WD40 is only good as a water dispersant for electrically conductive stuff and thats it. WD has little lubricating qualities and yes, it will gum up the works.

The WD in the name designates 'Water Dispersant'. Axle removal on any S&W revolver is very easy, I do it all the time when cleaning my revolvers, just have to remember the fixing end is a left hand thread.
 
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