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Discussion Starter #1
I am getting a Model 66-3 in a non-pinned 4" barrel. I'm just curious is the barrel threaded in or is it a press fit?
I like the longer barrel revolver models and was curious if it would be an easy task to have my Gunsmith switch it out for a 6" barrel. Will it be terribly expensive, outside of the cost of the barrel?
If it is a threaded barrel it shouldn't be too difficult. But pressed in is a whole different story I'm sure.
Have any of you had a pressed in barrel switched out? Was it difficult or costly?
I currently have a Model 14-3 pinned barrel that is being changed out due to an incident that damaged the original barrel. It is a pinned and threaded barrel and is not a problem for him to change out.

Any words on this idea?
I anticipate some solid answers here, Thanks
 

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That would be 'crush fit treads'. The change can be made, but not as easy as a pinned barrel
 

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It's generally cheaper, easier and quicker to just buy the model and barrel length you want, rather than switching barrels.
 

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I am having one switched now. It's a gunsmith job, while the barrel may screw up and fit properly odds are it will have to be cut back a thread to strike up were it should go. Plus it takes special tools to hold the frame properly and secure without damage. Unless the gunsmith does a fair amount of S&W barrel work he is not going to have the right fixture. Switching with home made frame jigs is looking for trouble.

Costing me about 100 for the gunsmith and another 100 for the new S&W barrel. I ought to be able to sell the take off for 50 bucks. Only reason for doing the switch is if you have something special that needs something special. My case it's a "tweaked" 625 that is 5 inch but needs to meet 4 inch IDPA rules. Otherwise better off to sell and buy another. Other route for me would be to cut an inch off but considering the front sight has to be re-set S&W has 4 inch barrels in stock and able to sell the 5 inch switching was the way to go. Ordinary 66 sell and re-buy is probably the best route. Except, I don't think I have ever seen a 6 inch M 66. No doubt they made them but not a common barrel length for the Stainless K's .

If you need a good gunsmith mine only does revolver work @ reasonable rates.

Boats
 

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I was always under the impression that S&W really cranked on the threaded barrel, until the threads were crushed. (cross-threaded) It would seem to me, that this would be very difficult to undo. It would mean......rethreading the frame and barrel. Am I wrong here? Bob
 

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kufO nothing holds like a cross thread... I always say...
 

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bob, You are right.....buy the right tool for the job. I carry my M-66 2 1/2" OWB, because I don't like anything to poke into my side. I do, however, carry a J frame IWB......it doesn't feel uncomfortable, unless I wear it for an extended period. But, I use it mostly during warmer weather. Snubby K frames are always OWB, with a good cover garmet in cooler weather. kfjdrfirii ;) Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the excellent input. I kinda figured it would either be a hassle or too expensive. Both is too much.
I just traded my Model 19 snubby for this one.
I'll keep it the way it is and I'm sure I will like it. It will be for carrying and not target shooting for the most part.
I'll keep my eyes out for a 6" model 66.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If I get a 686 how far back do I need to go to get a pre-lock model?
I see they are available in 6 or 7 shot, since there is no direct firing pin does it matter?
Do I still need to keep one chamber empty?
 

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gearchkr, You do not have to keep a chamber empty on a double action revolver. That rule only applies to older single action revolvers, because hitting the hammer will detonate a cartridge if it is in direct contact with the firing pin. Both the 66 and the 686 are nice revolvers. The 686 is built stronger, to handle heavy reloads. ;) Bob
 

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They made the 686 from I think 1982 and the locks were installed in 2001 on the dash 6 models.So a dash five back has no lock.Some years had round butts.You would have to ask some one else or google up some imformation on the years.
I have never owned one but got a chance to shoot one about a year ago with a square butt and 4 inch barrel and I just loved the gun. I had set up the deal on it and instantly regretted not buying the gun myself.
I dont remember what dash number it was but will find out.It belongs to a friend of mines wife and she loves it as much as she loves him.I fired about 20 rounds through it and her and my woman fired the rest of the box and then went through fifty more 158 grain 357 rounds.I think they would have burned through another box but they ran out of ammo.
 

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Asking an inexperianced 'smith' to replace a crush fit barrel is begging for a cracked frame.

If you simply MUST mess with this gun, let Smith & Wesson do it.

6" K-Magnums bring less money than 4" guns. Look around and make a better decision.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
RonJon,
You are breaking my heart. You make me jelouse! I want it!
I love the longer barrel wheelguns. Cost and value are of little importance to me as long as I'm not getting ripped off when I buy them.
I want these guns to shoot and just have till I go to that happy Smith & Wesson shooting range up in the sky when I die.
I just love the way the longer 6" & 8" barrel guns shoot.
I'm also keeping my eyes open for a 6" Model 27 or even better, a Model 627.

I just wish I could afford all of them I see.
Gearchecker
 

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No such thing as pressed in barrels or crush-fitted threads. At least not in any machinist's or engineering reference I have ever come across in the last 21 years.

There are different CLASSES of threads for UNF and UNC threads defining the closeness of the fit between the male and female halves of the thread.

Never heard of any manufacturer that purposefully designs a thread to gall or seize up upon tightening.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Re: Model 66-3 Non-pinned barrel Is it pressed in or threaded?

Is there a gunsmith out there that can explain how the barrels are fitted into the frame?
Can somebody comment on the post by JOSE below?
My original post will explain the reason for the post chain here.
I started the post asking about swapping barrels om my Model 66.

I have a Model 14-3 that is pinned and a Model 66-2 that is not pinned.

Is there a explaination for the particular fitting method used in a particular model?

How are the barrel mounts between a pinned vs. non-pinned different?
Are the non-pinned barrels screwed in or pressed in?
Why were the older barrels pinned and the new ones not.
How is the gap between the forcing cone and the cylinder adjusted?
How are the non-pinned barrels fitted into the frame?
 

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It's my understanding that the barrels are threaded in, and overtightened. S&W describes this practice as a "crush fit", so this means that the practice does exist. It may not be acceptable machining practice, but, the gun industry is not typical. Bob
 

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Barrel fit up in a S&W is pretty normal gunsmith pratice. It's tight and you ought to have a frame jig to take one off. The pin is old pratice many guns had some sort of pin to keep things tight. Not real nessicary in modern opinion. Only barrel fitting difference between a pinned gun and non pinned is the pin. Both are screwed in. Large Gap adjustment by facing off the rear of the barrel, fine adjustment by positon of the cylinder. That method has changed a bit over the years too.

If you want the details of this and any other S&W gunsmithing method. get Kunhausens (spelling ?) book. I am at work now and don't have the full name to refrence, somebody may be able to chine in. It's good reading if you plan to do some thngs yourself. Well worth the 25 bucks. Also useful before you let some jackleg gunsmith work on your pet Smith. Tells how it ought to be done. They are not parts replacers guns many things need hand fitting.

Boats
 
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