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So I bought this today on impulse. But now I can say I own a model 3. It said it was from 1888. Barrels cut. The trigger and hand both work. The cylinder turns (roughly) but the stop is broken. I wish the extractor worked, if nothing else I just love those extractors. But I still think it’s pretty neat, a 250 dollar wall hanger but I like the sense of history I feel holding it. What would it cost to restore something like this?
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Before you do anything you should remove the stocks and give it a good soak in a penetrating oil. Restoration is difficult parts are rare. Soaking it my loosen up stuck parts. My 38-44 target is in good shape the Russian is in poor shape barrel latch and hammer notches. There is a gentleman in Montana that has shown his efforts on this forum to restore them. He has talent as a machinist and makes the missing parts. It would be good for you to look up his posts in the antique section. You have a nice example of an old piece regardless
So I bought this today on impulse. But now I can say I own a model 3. It said it was from 1888. Barrels cut. The trigger and hand both work. The cylinder turns (roughly) but the stop is broken. I wish the extractor worked, if nothing else I just love those extractors. But I still think it’s pretty neat, a 250 dollar wall hanger but I like the sense of history I feel holding it. What would it cost to restore something like this? View attachment 468865
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info, I was looking around online and saw that dismantling and soaking in oil could fix a lot of the the function issues.
 

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Ed's red is a mixture of acetone and automatic transmission fluid, and possibly an additional ingredient in equal parts fairly cheap let it soak for a while maybe you will get lucky.
 

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They had a few of those at gun store yesterday, one was in great condition nickel was in good shape and the extractor worked. Brought a smile to my face even though I didn’t buy it. I’ll definitely try soaking it before anything else. Any recommendations on what oil to use?
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Soak it in auto transmission fluid for about a week. Get some aerosol auto parts/carb/brake cleaner and flush it thoroughly through the hammer and trigger openings. Flush the ejector housing as best you can.

From the looks of that housing and the square butt, it's a 1st model and probably an American. Does it have an oil weep hole on the bottom of the housing? Is it stamped Russian on the top strap? What variety .44 is it -- American or Russian. If the cylinder has a "step" in it, it is Russian. If drilled straight through, it's American.

Did the gun store make you fill out a 4473? It's an antique and not required to even go into their books much less bother ATF about it.

Here's my younger sister from 1874.
 
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