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Discussion Starter #1
Hi - I'm curious about my Model 29. The serial number dates it to 1966, I think. Is this a non-dash gun? What can you tell me about it's collectability? (Not selling, just curious.) Re-connecting with my Smith and Wesson youth - I think this may be the most perfectly balanced pistol I've ever held. Thanks very much.
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Yep, a no dash Model 29. They would number each engineering change- 29-1,29-2,29-3, etc. The -1 change wasn’t made but 1 year +/-. Then came change -2. Relatively few change -1 ‘s were made, making them more desirable to some of us. Same with the shorter barrels. And , of course, condition rules all else for collectors. With the 24-3 and that 29, you’ve got quite a start! Hank
 

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Yep, a no dash Model 29. They would number each engineering change- 29-1,29-2,29-3, etc. The -1 change wasn’t made but 1 year +/-. Then came change -2. Relatively few change -1 ‘s were made, making them more desirable to some of us. Same with the shorter barrels. And , of course, condition rules all else for collectors. With the 24-3 and that 29, you’ve got quite a start! Hank
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Very cool...
 

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Sweet mate...But.... the Dunlops have to go...


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Model 29 "No-Dash" guns were made between 1957 (when S&W started model marking guns) and 1960. I can't read the serial number, but unless its a dash two that was not correctly marked, 1966 is too late for a non model marked gun. Also, Thewelsm is correct about the rubber grips. They hold moisture and can ruin a gun by promoting rust. The original grips for that gun are quite valuable, if you have them. They were known by the factory as "Special Target Grips" and colloquially as "Coke Bottle Grips." While the market has softened somewhat recently, I've seen "Coke" grips sell for $500 and up if in pristine condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks very much for the replies. I wondered if that faint mark was a 2. I couldn't see it on the gun itself - I only saw it on the photo. I'll look again and see if that's what it is.

And I'll put some better grips on it - those were my dad's. I don't know if he has the wood grips but I'll find out.

Edit - after research it seems that this is obviously a -2, dating from about 1966. I'm sure we have original grips somewhere - we used to have so many pairs of those wooden target grips laying around. Every time someone would get a new pistol the first thing to do would be to take off the "clunky" stock grips and replace them with nice new rubber Pachmayrs. Never thought they would become valuable.
 

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Exactly what my Dad did over and over again, decades ago...still can't find 'em.
I'm sure we have original grips somewhere - we used to have so many pairs of those wooden target grips laying around. Every time someone would get a new pistol the first thing to do would be to take off the "clunky" stock grips and replace them with nice new rubber Pachmayrs. Never thought they would become valuable.
 

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Nice book! I have one of them myself.

Regarding the Hogue(?) grips: For me they make all the difference in the world. I would keep them on and FWIW, I have never seen any rust under them. If you go with the wood grips, you'll probably find that the roll pin that locates the grips at the bottom is gone, as it interferes with the installation of the Hogue grips.
 
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