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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First time posting so thanks for having me. I have other smiths but I'm looking at a 300xxx serial number model 1905.

I will post pics later but basic info is that it is covered in glossy black paint with a rack number so few markings are visible. The serial is visible on the butt with a triangle mark opposite the lanyard ring. There is something inside the triangle that I can't quite make out but it is similar to the izzy triangle on mosins.

I have searched and can't find any easy Google info on that marking or black painted with rack numbers. The paint and number gives me the impression this is a lend lease pistol or maybe police but that Mark has me puzzled.
 

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Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! Is it possible that mark is a V? It sounds to me like you have a Victory model, perhaps even a British service revolver. The British in India and Pakistan refinished a lot of their handguns in a stove paint. It might also account for the rack number if it was used after the war for law enforcement. We need pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Orientation of the marking is rotated 90degrees to the right and it is not a V.

I do not have this pistol in hand so I am limited to the images I can download. I can't do that with my phone so it has to wait until I am at the computer.

The rack number and paint does remind of Indian work similar to the numbers on my RFI cutdown bayonet.
 

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Do you recall the size and shape of the extractor rod knob? A 300xxx serial would put the gun manufacture in 1919. The extractor rod would be shaped like a mushroom, like on this Model 1917.


A gun made during WWII would have a barrel shaped knob, like on this 1931 K22 Outdoorsman.


Also, the serial number would read correctly if the barrel is pointed to the right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think I see a very faint upside down remnant of "united states" overlying the Smith and Wesson on the side of the barrel.

There also appear to be some letters on the side of the trigger that I cant make out.
 

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BTW, if you are looking to purchase this revolver, I recommend against it. You can find much better examples of WWII militaria. I'd put it in the $100-150 value range...if it functions as it should. Also, no significant attempts at restoration will make it more valuable than the cost of restoration. Pass and keep looking. These guns are not rare.
 
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The British had refurb facilities in India and Pakistan that used Suncorite paint. You might try researching the Rifle Factory - Ishapore...Ishapore Arsenal. BTW, there should be a V under the paint on the butt next to that mark. Also, it could be remnants of the Flaming Bomb ordnance mark.
 
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I think it’s Ishapore too. Except that I think the refinish occurred after the gun’s British period and with a cheaper black paint than Suncorite. The Indians refurbished those themselves after the Indian government took over RFI after 1948. Some of these in similar appearance will show an FTR stamp from RFI and the years 1967 and 1968.

Btw, this has to be a Victory from 1943. If there is no V on the butt, it got lost. With that font of the digits, which did not come into use until 1942, and the orientation of the number (to the right of the swivel hole when reading it), it cannot be a no-prefix earlier gun. Check back of cylinder, and underbarrel for a V.
 
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