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Hi. I posted earlier but it got lost. New member having posting issues. Anyhow-
SW DA.45 stamped United States Property 6 shot revolver. Is this the "hand ejector military" model? Serial appear under ejector pin 73736. I am trying to determine at and value. Family gun. Thanks. Gun Revolver Firearm Trigger Starting pistol
Gun Revolver Firearm Trigger Starting pistol
Revolver Gun Firearm Trigger Starting pistol


Thanks for your time and assistance. Angus.
God Bless the USA and all that fight for it.
 

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Yes indeed, you have a Hand Ejector 2nd Model.......commonly referred to as a Model 1917. They were manufactured for the military in WWI and saw duty by the U.S. and England (WWI & WWII). Yours has been refinished and wears aftermarket grips/stocks, they were made in a satin blue finish. There was also a Civilian Model as well as a Brazilian Contract Model (Model of 1937).

Colt also made a similar version............

I have several of them, they're great shooters. Here's one that looks similar to yours....

Gun Firearm Revolver Trigger Starting pistol

Gun Revolver Firearm Trigger Starting pistol


As a family heirloom, yours is priceless...................

Welcome to the forum,

Geezer
 

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welcome01 to the forums from the Wiregrass! Your Model 1917 DA .45 revolver was made in June 1918. You say the SN appears under the ejector pin. Does that mean there is no U. S. Army 1917 and SN stamped on the butt? If so, the gun is in violation of BATFE regulations and could be confiscated. The SN must be on the frame somewhere. It is possible that whoever polished it off restamped it on the side of the butt frame...I hope. Also, those grips appear to be made for a K frame gun as they fit poorly around the top.

Here is what the butt should look like. This is a Colt 1917.



Here is an example of what the original grips looked like early in WWI. By the time your gun was made, the concave tops were rounded out into a convex shape, but no medallion.

 

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The butt is smooth. The only place I could find the serial was under the ejector rod (cylinder open).
Priceless as a family heirloom I interpret as no real monetary value. It is absolutely a classic pistol.

Thanks
 

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There should also be a SN on the face of the cylinder that matches under the barrel. You need to have those numbers, if they are identical, stamped or etched on the grip frame. In its current condition, the gun is not legal per the GCA of 1968.

Almost any S&W N frame is worth $500 if it functions. I believe what Geezer meant is that the value of that gun is worth more as an heirloom than it could bring in a sale. That's particularly true now because you can't sell it...legally.
 

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There should also be a SN on the face of the cylinder that matches under the barrel. You need to have those numbers, if they are identical, stamped or etched on the grip frame. In its current condition, the gun is not legal per the GCA of 1968.

Almost any S&W N frame is worth $500 if it functions. I believe what Geezer meant is that the value of that gun is worth more as an heirloom than it could bring in a sale. That's particularly true now because you can't sell it...legally.
Thank you Guy, that's exactly what I meant.................

Angusnstep, as Guy has mentioned, by law the serial number must be present somewhere on the main frame of the gun, If it's on the underside of the barrel and also on the cylinder face, it must still be on the main frame somewhere. I strongly suggest that you carefully remove the grips (take care not to bugger the grip screw) and look at the sides of the grip frame (where you can't see while the grips are on) to see if someone inscribed the serial number on it. The grip frame is part of the main frame so it satisfies the law if the serial number is inscribed there. Normally the "official serial number" would be on the bottom of the butt, but it would appear that it was removed when the revolver was refinished,

If the serial number on the bottom of the barrel matches the serial number on he cylinder face and not on the main frame somewhere, then you may want to inscribe that same number on the side of the grip frame (under the grip so as not to deface the frame). FYI, if the barrel serial number does not match the cylinder face number, there's a good chance it's a "parts gun" (made of parts from several guns)....................If you suspect that it's a parts gun, then two considerations surface.......1) "was it properly and safely put together?" 2) "Could the parts have come from a de-milled gun and if so, hopefully the serial number doesn't represent a gun that was confiscated and the number remains on file somewhere.

I certainly don't want to come across as being overly cautious.....but these are important legal considerations and the negative consequences are not worth you getting wrapped up with........and it also affects the value.

Best Regards,

Geezer
 
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