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A friend of mine purchased his first S&W, a Mod. 67. He could not find any .38 Special ammo and an acquaintance gave him two boxes of +P ammo. One of the boxes is S&W and the other is Winchester. The weight grains for this ammo is 90 and 125. He asked me if this is safe to shoot in his revolver. I wasn't sure so I come to the Forum with a quest for information. Thanks for the help with my request.

Stinger
 

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The "pat" line is that +P ammo is okay for 'limited' use in 3- & 4- Screw K-frames (post 1958 or so....) so your pal's Model 67 is pretty safe....

I remember that 90 Grain S&W stuff when it first came out.... was pretty hot.

Drew
 

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Not to disagree with Drew...... he knows much more than me, when it comes to guns......probably other things as well. (He's actually successful as an engineer, whereas, due to circumstances beyond my control, I am not!) :roll:

But, I am a long time owner of an original M-67 no dash, and I shoot Rem. or Win. +P .38 spl. 125 gr. JHP or JSP ammo all the time, and have yet to encounter a problem. Modern +P ammo is about the same as .38 spl. std. ammo of days gone by. Lawyers and Liability have weakened modern ammo considerably. S&W says that to cover their butt, for liability cases.........lawyers. :roll: Bob
 

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Bob,

Regardless of our experiences, I have to wonder about the advisability of contradicting Smith & Wesson's recommendations.

Best regards,

Drew
 

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Drew, You, undoubtedly, know better than I. I don't shoot my better guns that much. This, includes my old M-67. ;) Bob
 

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You can't go wrong if you stay with factory recommendations. Now I am speaking for myself and this is NOT a recommendation. I have shot my 1960 era M&P snub nose 38 Special with some of my warm reloads. I did not shoot it extensively with these loads, but enough to know where they printed. I never noticed any adverse effects. I know a few others who did the same with like results.

It's kinda like being a pilot. Once you exceed the recommended aircraft limits as specified by the manufacturer of the airplane you are flying, you are no longer a pilot, you are NOW a "Test Pilot". As such you now assume all the responsibility for the risk you take. . .Good Luck!
 
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