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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's raining over here again, so I'm messing with my camera. This is my highly buffed 625 engraved revolver I'm trying to photograph. It's shiny so this gives me, "the amateur photographer" more stuff to figure out. next time, I'll use more light. At least I figured out how to use focus...

















Anybody have micro pictures?? Add them here. :mrgreen:
 

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500,

Very nice detail on the 625. I really like that it is not over-done.

How did you go from the amber hues in the first few to the white hues in the last couple?

The pics are very sharp at that real close range.

Very nice work!

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was messing with the photoshop settings on the color and brightness. It was taken with a 40 watt bulb over the revolver. The work was done at the S&W factory last year. I don't recall what I paid but it was around 1200 bucks or more for the 75% coverage.

Buyer beware. I bought this gun new a while ago, off one of the auction sites. It was a lemon. Nearly everything was screwed up on it. However, it was new in box. It had minor scratches thru the glass bead finish. It had a dent on the muzzle crown. The barrel cylinder gap was .011 inch, the timing was off. The rear sight elevation screw was set to high, blocking your sight picture and lastly there was around .003 endshake. I worked on it on and off for several weeks at my leisure until I had it where I liked it. I sent it off to S&W so they could refinish it and re-laser the name on the gun. Well, like normal that came back with a mismatch which gave the lettering a blur effect.
I decided what the heck and sent it off to their engraving department with a note on what I wanted done, and it was to be done with no darn laser machine!
Now, I don't shoot it....go figure.

I'm thinking of toning down the brite polish and turn it into a plinking revolver. It's accurate now with the muzzle crown fixed. Well, maybe next week... :mrgreen:
 

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Well I got to tell ya 500...

The reason that you got the "Lemon", is that you're the only one that could cut it into a bright diamond!

I'm with you on wanting to shoot it. Go for it, but I wouldn't de-brighten it just to shoot it though.

I was wondering about the LASER alignment while I read that and then read it wasn't, it figures! I wish the LASER ELK on my Rocky Mountain Hunter was deeper or more defined. It has actually lightened from cleaning. I wondered if they could redo it. Proly not. ONE day I'll just do what you did, just have it engraved, I guess I can dream.

Anyway, Fantastic smithin' to do all that, you gotta shoot it!

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
WGlide90 said:
I was wondering about the LASER alignment while I read that and then read it wasn't, it figures! I wish the LASER ELK on my Rocky Mountain Hunter was deeper or more defined. It has actually lightened from cleaning. I wondered if they could redo it. Proly not. ONE day I'll just do what you did, just have it engraved
Dave
If you one day send it back for laser etching, take scotchbrite and completely remove the old lettering. Ask them to refinish it, then re-laser it. It will take them several months to do (maybe 200-300 bucks), but at least the mismatch of the letters won't get you down...
 

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That is the way to make lemonade from lemons!! Nice job!!
 

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I used to be a studio photographer and have a couple of tricks I think you all you can use if you want.

The trick isn't more light. It's where the light is coming from, AND the "size" of the light source.

There are 2 easy ways to take pics of really shiny objects.
Remember to look at the object from the cameras viewfinder before you take the picture to see exactly how the reflection will look when you do take the picture!!

The best way to photograph a shiny object is to have it completly surrounded by a non-reflective black blockade. I use a big box (3' x 3' x 3', or bigger if you can get one) and have it painted completly flat black inside.
Then cut a few flaps in the box in different places on the front of the box, and a couple on the forward part of the box top. One of the flaps will need to be on the front, about 10" or 12" from the bottom, and big enough that you can put the whole camera face into the opening (you don't want to block the autofocus beam)

Get 1 or 2 of those blue daylight lightbulbs.
The flaps need to be about 2-3 times the size of the lightbulb.
Pull open a flap and shine the light into the box, with the light just outside of the box.
You can move the light around the flap to get just the right amount of light bouncing off of the object and at an angle that you like the light reflecting they way you want it to.
You can also move the object around a little inside the box as well to get it "just right" If the light is still too bright just take some white handkerchiefs and tape over the flap opening to soften the light. You can even use a couple of lights from different flaps to cast shadowed light.
Turn the camera's flash OFF.
Point your camera thru the flap cut out for the camera, on a mini tripod, or even on a stack of books.
You can take your pic and make it look like you have been doing this all of your life.

The 2nd way is to simply go out on your front porch on a mostly cloudy day (to eliminate the reflections from the direct sun).
Put a couple of blankets (Black or White work best since they won't cast any odd color on your object)up on 2 sides.
Put a white sheet or cloth behind you with a hole cut in the center - (don't let your wife or girlfrind see you cut the hole in it though!)
You can use a Light Blue cloth if you are shooting chrome, for better color.
Move the object around inside the area to get the light and reflections just right.

With a little practice and patience you can easily take picture that look like they came out of a high end photography studio (they won't tell you their secrets, but I will).
If you are having trouble getting the results you want, e-mail me with a couple of your pics and I can probably help you out. Or you can take your pics to a local camera store and they will usually help you, explaining how to get the best shots.
It's in their best interest for you to get great pics, so they can print enlargments.

Take your pictures and share them with us.
You might even want to look at framing and hanging your pictures in your trophy room or shop. Then you can enjoy your guns - even when they are in the safe.

So far the pics here are great!
If you want more info or help, you can PM me or e-mail me for answers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
gearchecker said:
I used to be a studio photographer and have a couple of tricks I think you all you can use if you want.
Thank you for helping us amateurs out! Your correct on the outside cloudy day pictures, I'll attempt a new set when I have a few hours alone to myself with the better half not stalking me. :D

You should copy and paste your info in the tread here about tips and tricks....
 

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gearchecker,
Great tips for better photography.
Thank you!
500,
That gun of yours is now a fine 'exhibition piece'.
Left to my own devices, I wouldn't mess with the high-polish finish, shooter or not.
The engraving really adds a great deal to the gun.
Interesting, isn't it, how a 'NIB' gun can have so many annoying things wrong, huh?
Don
;)
 

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Something I didn't mention.


ihjf welldone
That is one of the finest pieces of workmanship I have seen on a handgun in a very long time. Your pictures really do this engraving justice.
I agree with the lemonade comment completely!

Can your smithy do work like that on my ex? Just kidding.

Thanks for the pics it is pure enjoyment looking at a handgun as beautiful as that.
 
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