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Discussion Starter #1
Here's a M-1849 Colt 'Pocket Revolver' in .31 caliber.
The gripframes on these puppies were brass, but they were silver-plated.
This particular gun was manufactured in 1866, and it shows evidence of an ancient refinish.
The barrel inscription is light but readable, but the 'stagecoach' engraving on the cylinder is down to the two wheels and little else.
Action is remarkably strong, nipples are excellent, and safety pins are still there.
Took it apart the other evening, and I'm amazed at the craftsmanship!
Don
 

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I wish I knew enough about BP to make an intelligent statement, but I don't.. so, I'll just say this..

Don,
Very cool!! kfjdrfirii
 
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Isn't amazing that every once in awhile a excellent example of a older percussion revolver shows up. I see a couple each year and it blows me away, each time...

And as nice as the reproductions are becoming...there is absolutely nothing like finding a great example of an original...

Well done, Don!!!


giz
 

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That's pretty neat. Not often you get a chance to latch on to the genuine article. Refinished or not, it looks great. All my BP Colts are 2d or 3d generation issues and I shoot 'em all. My personal favorite is the 1851 Navy.
 

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I don't have any praticial expericence with single action revolvers or even black powder. But I can say that your Colt is just plumb neat. Nothing like having the real deal and being able to hold a piece of history in your hands. Reminds me of the scene from "The Outlaw Joesy Wales " ..are you boys going to whistle Dixie or.... Great score.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Lincoln had been dead for less than a year, the M-1873 'Peacemaker' was still 7 years into the future, and here's what really gave me a chill...
I fished a partial piece of a paper-jacketed load from one of the charge-holes.
Used a small gunsmith's tweezers.
That scrap of paper still had the burn-mark around its edge.
Who shot who, or what?
I know that lots of Civil War soldiers (on both sides) carried the M-1849 as a 'backup' gun.
This one was made too late for the war, but did some carpetbagger carry it?
Better yet, did someone who didn't like carpetbaggers use it?
The gun hasn't been shot much, and when I reassembled the barrel and frame, then seated the assembly with a wooden mallet, the entire gun 'rang' like a tuning fork.
It's no wonder Samuel Colt became such a 'big hitter'.
Sadly, Colt died before this gun was made.
Sure do wish they could talk!
Don
;)
 

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A couple decades ago there was a real Remington 1863 44 cap and ball in a gunshop priced out like a well worn replica. A friend of mine asked to see it and as soon as he recoganized that it was authentic it was sold. The boss had assumed that it was a replica when he priced out and of course he had not paid much for it. That Gun Shop owner from time to time had other well worn authentic pieces that if anything were higher in price than book.
 
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