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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
She's a beauty:

477572


477573


So far all I can drum up is a .38 Model 10, no dash (it does not state Model 10). The five screws (it has a screw in the trigger guard) should indicate it is 1905 - 1955 or somewhere in there. I have the S&W book coming and hopefully can get some serial number help to dial me into the year. Excellent, excellent condition - both mechanically and cosmetically. Very slight wear on the plate near the stock. Fires wonderfully. Digging this lovely lady!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Could be, I have no history on it. I will admit I used some Mothers Mag & Aluminum polish on it. Rubbed it up, then used a polishing cone on my drill press (low speed) and buffed it. Made it shine like that.
 

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If it were original finish the sideplate seam should be almost invisible also.
If it isn't marked "Mod 10" in the cutout behind the cylinder yoke, then its correct name would be 38 special M&P, though many people would call it a "Pre-model 10". Being a 5-screw it is on the early end of the time period Adirondacker referred to - probably closer to 1948 than 1955.
Nice old shooter, even though it isn't a high value collectable.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The innards. From there I only removed the cylinder and yoke (taking it apart to polish the cylinder), main spring, hammer lock and hammer, leaving the rest in place. Did run the hammer on my drill press buffer and got that cone into the trigger to polish up the trigger and the guard, frame, and plate. It all got buffed smartly.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If it were original finish the sideplate seam should be almost invisible also.
If it isn't marked "Mod 10" in the cutout behind the cylinder yoke, then its correct name would be 38 special M&P, though many people would call it a "Pre-model 10". Being a 5-screw it is on the early end of the time period Adirondacker referred to - probably closer to 1948 than 1955.
Nice old shooter, even though it isn't a high value collectable.
No Mod 10 anywhere on it, just an old serial number I can't match anywhere. Hopefully the book will shed some light.
 

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Was made between 1948 and 1952. In 1948, the 4 line "registratus" was implemented. In 1952, the half penny front sight was replaced by a ramp. The serial number should start with a C. Look under the barrel, on the grip frame and on the face of the cylinder for an N stamp. That indicates it was originally nickel out of the factory.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There is a C on the base of the frame followed by a large space then a 5 digit serial. Under the barrel it has a CN then the same serial, but in the frame recess where the yoke pops in is a different number (not on the yoke) that has what looks like a large B that is worn to look more like a large 3 then on the next line five different numbers. Yoke has different numbers again as usual.
 

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A C with 5 digits is either 1948 or 1949. If you can give us the serial XX out the last 3 digits and we may be able to narrow the date down.
 

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Can you explain, specifically, why that would be advisable?
Because some folks are uncomfortable posting their whole serial numbers in a public forum and we don't need the last two or three digits to get an approximate ship date. But let's not hijack this thread further with off-topic posts. PM me if you want to argue.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Got the Standard Catalog of Smith and Wesson book in today (4th ed). According to it if the factory re-finished a gun they may have put a stamp on it. One example was an 'S'. Looking at this I see three areas where an 'S' is stamped: on the butt, under the barrel, and on the yoke.

477791


477792


I removed the serial number in that last shot. Guessing the 'N' means nickel plating, and the 'S' could be indicating it was refinished at the factory (and it looks like the N was stamped over, with the under one looking older and less deep). Book says that could fetch a price in-between original and aftermarket finish. But anyone could stamp that S on there.

What are these?

477793


I know what the number is (matches the number on the yoke). On all the S&W's there are some symbol stamping like this. The .357 model 66 has a rounded triangle with an 'X' in it and a circle with a 'B', the .357 model 586 has a circle with an 'E' and a heart with a '4', etc. Are these armorer signatures or something like that? The 66 has stamps all over one butt: C3, C4, S with a C7 kind of under it, B15.
 

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The nickel-plated trigger and hammer mean that it cannot be a factory refinish; these would have been left in case color.

The S is simply a service department mark which indicates that the gun failed final inspection the first time and the part stamped with the S received attention before the gun shipped out for the first time.

The serial C 38xxx places production in late 1948 or early 1949. Extrapolating from known serials, the divide is somewhere around C 40,000 (+/-).

.... Since it ran up to 99999 to 1957. Right?
Not sure where you got this. It ran up to C 99999 in 1949/50 and C 999999 in 1968.
 

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Many times a diamond or box was stamped next to the S, especially if the part was replaced or repaired. This is for major parts like barrel, frame, cylinder...
 
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