Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey everyone I’m looking to get some help identifying this Smith & Wesson CTG revolver. It was my grandfather and passed passed to me by my dad. I know it needs a good cleaning but I’m mainly having trouble finding a holster. I don’t plan to shoot it but would like to be able to carry it with me due to where I work. Any information is appreciated and thanks in advance I’ll do my best to put numbers in pictures. The numbers in the buttons of the grip are 37880 and the ones in the 3rd pic are 9660 B
 

Attachments

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,079 Posts
Start by getting the rust under control with some preserving spray gun oil, and then get it to a gunsmith to have it properly inspected, lubricated and cleaned internally to ensure it is safe and in operating condition.

Next, before you consider carrying it, get some basic safety and marksmanship training, and look into the laws where you live to ensure that you can legally carry the firearm. Also double check to ensure that you don't violate any work rules your employer may have in place and get yourself fired.

Is it marked with the caliber? ".38 special" or ".38 Smith and Wesson" or something else? It looks like a S&W "K" frame revolver, so finding a holster should not be a problem. You'll need a proper stiff gun belt and a holster fitted for a S&W "K" frame revolver if that is what this is. Make sure the holster will accommodate the barrel length.

This looks like a very early S&W Hand Ejector. These were not designed for use with modern over-pressure ammunition, but may be safe with standard velocity ammunition.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
23,217 Posts
Welcome to the forums from the Wiregrass! IF that is a .38 Special, it is a Model 1902 Military & Police revolver that was made in 1903. CTG is just an abbreviation for cartridge and not a model name. It looks pretty rough. The action on that M&P is obsolete and made up of flat springs and levers. If it looks inside like it does outside, you may have a wall hanger or a candidate for a shadow box. Holsters are readily available as Marc says above.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Start by getting the rust under control with some preserving spray gun oil, and then get it to a gunsmith to have it properly inspected, lubricated and cleaned internally to ensure it is safe and in operating condition.

Next, before you consider carrying it, get some basic safety and marksmanship training, and look into the laws where you live to ensure that you can legally carry the firearm. Also double check to ensure that you don't violate any work rules your employer may have in place and get yourself fired.

Is it marked with the caliber? ".38 special" or ".38 Smith and Wesson" or something else? It looks like a S&W "K" frame revolver, so finding a holster should not be a problem. You'll need a proper stiff gun belt and a holster fitted for a S&W "K" frame revolver if that is what this is. Make sure the holster will accommodate the barrel length.

This looks like a very early S&W Hand Ejector. These were not designed for use with modern over-pressure ammunition, but may be safe with standard velocity ammunition.
Hey Marc thanks for the info, it says “.38 special and under it “u.s. service ctg” I know that the comment under yours states that that just specifies cartridge. So if there another pic I need to add I can. It’s defeintly gonna get a good cleaning and I’ve owned a newer model pistol before so I know the laws and safety precautions in my area. What you said about the ammunition was very helpful though so thanks again!!
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
23,217 Posts
it says “.38 special and under it “u.s. service ctg” I know that the comment under yours states that that just specifies cartridge.
When your gun was made, the U.S. military used the .38 Long Colt as the preferred cartridge for military sidearms. It was the "U.S. Service CTG." It was also underpowered and caused problems with insurrection in the Philippines. So much so, the military resurrected .44 and .45 single actions that had been mothballed so the troops had sufficient firepower. S&W sensed an opportunity and created the .38 S&W Special cartridge in 1899 to coincide with its new .38 Military & Police revolver. S&W stretched the .38 Long Colt so it could pack in more black powder and thus be more powerful and called the new cartridge the .38 S&W Special. They hoped to capture the military market by becoming the replacement for the .38 Long Colt. It didn't work out because the military chose the .45 ACP and the Model 1911 pistol as the new cartridge and sidearm in 1906. S&W stamped "U.S. Service CTG" on their barrels from around 1900 until the military made its decision and it was apparent they would not consider the .38 Special for military sidearms.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top