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Wondering if any of our members has given knifemaking a go...

I want to start with some simple kit style knives and maybe go to the next level or two. If you've already done this, any advice?

I've bought the books about the Loveless method and have Goddard's book on setting up the equipment. I already own many of the tools and machines to start making knives even from bar stock. Part of my being in the trades ;) I have good friends that are accomplished blacksmiths to guide me in the black arts...

So, whaddya' think..I have a pretty good eye for design, have worked my life with hand and power tools...

Should I give it a go?

giz
 

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I made one pocket knife from scratch except the main spring which I modified from an old knife. I made the bolsters from a kick plate, the blade was from an old bar-b-que skewer my dad used to use to make lamb on. The scales are walnut and the pins are nickle. It took a long time with a lot of polishing, but I like it. It walks and talks and has a nice edge.





 
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Dom,

Hope you don't find the question intrusive, because it's going to sound like it is...
But I would think that because of the story, wouldn't this be one of your most valued possessions? ;)

I like it alot. I was just pondering making a knife or two...but yours is on a very personal level. Seems like knives are that way. Anyway, my friend...seems like time well spent.

giz
 

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Hunter,

You must have an eye for style and proportion because your homemade knife has both - even to the slight hollow grind to your blade!

I don't have the required artistic ability, knowledge, or talent for this sort of thing, but I commend anyone who does.

Giz,

You should give it a shot!

xtm
 

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Thanks guys!

And Giz you are absolutely right. it is because of the blade. My Dad was the best, he had hands of gold and a big heart. He was a diesel engineer, a sailor, a carpenter and mason your name it. If it had to do with using his hands he could build anything. When I hold that knife I know the steel had been in his hands many many times. I am passing on the things he taught me to my sons as I will that knife one day.
 
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Dom,

Give me the liberty of suggesting a name for your knife....before you hand it down.

As such things that pass thru time, actually deserve a name.... ~ Optime'

Translated from the Latin - "Well Done!"
 

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You should do it, with your appreciation for knives and guns you will find it very rewarding. The big drawback is it will take up a lot of your time.

I made knives for a lot of years and really enjoyed it. I recently realized I didn't have one left that I made the blade. They sold faster than I could make them. I do have some customized ones around (I bought the blade).

To start try some of the blades and kits from Texas Knifemakers Supply, the Cryogenic treated ones are worth the extra few $. I sent mine there for this treatment when I made them.
Bob
 

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I put together the knife pictured here about 40 years ago. It was bought as a kit for a reasonable ptice including the blade and a piece of horn for the handle "imported Shefield Steel from England." I worked in a machine shop and used a piece of brass and 2 scraps of Aluminum bar stock to get the finished result.



The biggest problem that had was finding a proper sheath and finally found that a replacement for the Uncle Henry sheath worked well.
 

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These were made from kits using armadillo shell for handles.



This filet knife was made from a blade from TKS. Good luck finding new handle material like this without air bubbles. The sheaths are not hard to make if someone shows you how.



The guard is made from 2 pieces of nickel silver barstock and a piece of brass sheet silver soldered together. The pins are made from tubing filled with epoxy colored with pigment.

There are so many little things you can do that make a knife unique. It's a great hobby.

Bob

 
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Bob,

Those are stunning :eek:

Managed to dig thru my stuff. Found a bunch of files that I bought yardsailing. I will anneal one tomorrow in my woodstove. Then rough out a design. Pretty much have the equipment to do a stock removal knife...this should be fun...

giz
 

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I made a few from blade blanks a few years ago. I am more into the wood working than I am into blade making. I have a rubber wheel that I bought at a lapidary supply place years ago. It is 3" wide and 8" in diameter and takes abrasive sleeves from 80 to 800 grit. I also have a felt wheel for final polishing. I mount these on a wood lathe using a #2 Morse Taper.

Here is a knife that I made using Birdseye Maple.



 
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