Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

· Banned
Joined
·
1,974 Posts
Because of record breaking gun sales to first time buyers every gun related business, gun stores, holster stores, ammo stores are posting gun safety rules on Facebook. And every dang one gets it wrong from the start. Remove "treat as if" from your vocabulary.

RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

RULE II: NEVER LET THE MUZZLE COVER ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY

RULE III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET

RULE IV: BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET


RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

There are no exceptions. Do not pretend that this is true. Some people and organizations take this rule and weaken it;e.g. "Treat all guns as if they were loaded." Unfortunately, the "as if" compromises the directness of the statement by implying that they are unloaded, but we will treat them as though they are loaded. No good! Safety rules must be worded forcefully so that they are never treated lightly or reduced to partial compliance.

All guns are always loaded - period!

This must be your mind-set. If someone hands you a firearm and says, "Don't worry, it's not loaded," you do not dare believe him. You need not be impolite, but check it yourself. Remember, there are no accidents, only negligent acts. Check it. Do not let yourself fall prey to a situation where you might feel compelled to squeal, "I didn't know it was loaded!"

https://thefiringline.com/Misc/safetyrules.html
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,431 Posts
Rule 1 thru Rule 10: All guns are loaded.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Because of record breaking gun sales to first time buyers every gun related business, gun stores, holster stores, ammo stores are posting gun safety rules on Facebook. And every dang one gets it wrong from the start. Remove "treat as if" from your vocabulary.

RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

RULE II: NEVER LET THE MUZZLE COVER ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY

RULE III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET

RULE IV: BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET


RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

There are no exceptions. Do not pretend that this is true. Some people and organizations take this rule and weaken it;e.g. "Treat all guns as if they were loaded." Unfortunately, the "as if" compromises the directness of the statement by implying that they are unloaded, but we will treat them as though they are loaded. No good! Safety rules must be worded forcefully so that they are never treated lightly or reduced to partial compliance.

All guns are always loaded - period!

This must be your mind-set. If someone hands you a firearm and says, "Don't worry, it's not loaded," you do not dare believe him. You need not be impolite, but check it yourself. Remember, there are no accidents, only negligent acts. Check it. Do not let yourself fall prey to a situation where you might feel compelled to squeal, "I didn't know it was loaded!"

https://thefiringline.com/Misc/safetyrules.html
I agree. However, in 1978 when I went thru the NRA safety course, we were taught “treat every gun AS IF it was loaded.” So, I see why it is still used.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
9,316 Posts
Safety is about discipline. You don't have to be a highly trained operator but you do need discipline. I have read too many stories about well trained folks, including trainers, who screw up because they get lazy, once.

As counterintuitive as it may sound, at our club the young guys follow the rules to a T. It's the older more experienced gents who sometimes become complacent. I suspect that may not be a popular observation here, but it's the truth.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
13,715 Posts
Since I was a kid, my guns are ALWAYS loaded, even when they're not. If I hand a gun to someone, it's with an open cylinder or open chamber.........Period.

If I'm out shooting and hand someone a loaded piece, I say, "It's loaded and ready to fire" and I make sure they acknowledge it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
12,326 Posts
Since I was a kid, my guns are ALWAYS loaded, even when they're not. If I hand a gun to someone, it's with an open cylinder or open chamber.........Period.

If I'm out shooting and hand someone a loaded piece, I say, "It's loaded and ready to fire" and I make sure they acknowledge it.
That's the way I do it too.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
23,304 Posts
RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED

RULE II: NEVER LET THE MUZZLE COVER ANYTHING YOU ARE NOT WILLING TO DESTROY

RULE III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET

RULE IV: BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET AND BEYOND


RULE I: ALL GUNS ARE ALWAYS LOADED


The way I was taught. Also: The only time a gun is safe is when it's pointed in a safe direction. Safeties, human or otherwise fail on occasion & aren't to be trusted, if a gun is pointed in a safe direction when things fail no one bleeds.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
18,052 Posts
Even after checking twice to ensure a gun is empty, I still Treat is as if loaded. I know it isn't, so I can safely dry fire, but point it in a safe direction while doing so...as if it were loaded. If you treat every gun as if it IS LOADED, you could never safely dry fire in your house, because I wouldn't shoot a loaded gun in my house....if every gun is always loaded you couldn't clean it, because you wouldn't do that with a loaded gun. I believe that is why the NRA always taught to treat it as if loaded
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,942 Posts
I agree totally.
Numerous times I have made a presentation at my Daughter's Christian school showing them several military weapons. I always start it by saying "there are three rules to keep in mind when handling guns: Safety...safety...and safety".:cool:
Then I go over the famous Four Rules. I start by showing them a 1911 Colt. Ask for a volunteer. Then I lock the slide back and ask him to look to see if it's loaded. Always says no. I tell them he's wrong. I say Rule #1 is "Treat all guns as if they are loaded". I say "I always change that to There is NO SUCH THING as an unloaded gun, even if you have checked it and double checked as I always do".:cool:
It made a good impression an all of 'em, plus it was fun.:p
Jim
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,707 Posts
Our small group does a lot of show and tell. Almost all of us were in teh military at one point or the other and the one rule that seems to have stuck is .. when you hand a gun over for inspection the bolt is open.

So if one of us hands a gun over to a buddy so they can check it out it is always with either the cylinder open and to the side, or if its a semi the slide is racked and locked open. You inspect it before handing it over and they inspect it on hand off ... then we can try the trigger and all that other fun stuff.

While I of course think its important to always be safe .. I think some guys can get a little nuts. I have worked with peoples firearms regularly for years. While I am extremely careful .. there is no way I can work with it without on occasion pointing at myself .. it just is what it is. Its not Nitro ready to explode if I shake it to hard .. its a tool and I have worked with a ton of tools in my work life that were at least as dangerous.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,567 Posts
When at BSA summer camp, earned the marksmanship merit badge. We were taught, "Treat every firearm as if it is loaded." Always have. Doesn't matter if the firearm is in fact unloaded. I follow the rule I learned. Never point a firearm at anything you do not intend to shoot. That one little rule would absolutely avoid all problems, even if someone mishandled a loaded firearm. For the record, only one firearm in my home is ever always loaded. That firearm is the Sig 226 that stays on the nightstand. Everything else is unloaded. But, everything is treated as if it is loaded. Sincerely. bruce.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I might get roasted for this ("might" used loosely), but I've always taken issue with this. I understand the good intention -- especially for those being introduced to firearms for the first time -- but it's simply not a true statement, and I doubt any of us here actually adhere to it. The fact of the matter is there are exceptions, and it's these exceptions that make general proficiency and astuteness paramount over any rules.

1. If every gun is loaded without exception, what are you doing cleaning a loaded firearm? Why are you performing maintenance or smithing on a loaded firearm? Why are you testing the trigger on a loaded firearm prior to purchase? Why are you training your muscle memory with dry-fire/snap-cap drills with a loaded firearm? You sure as hell better be doing all of these things with an exceptionally unloaded firearm.

2. "All guns are loaded" may backfire (pun intended) in the unfortunate event you have to use your firearm against an active threat. Don't take for granted that your firearm is loaded or even chambered; make sure of it one way or the other. Not all guns are loaded. You're the master of any weapon you should handle and it's up to you to know what's in the chamber at any given time, whether a live round, a snap-cap, or air.

As with many rules, there are exceptions (take grammatical rules in the English language for example). At the risk of these rules becoming an inaccurate and thus unreliable dependency akin to training wheels or safety nets, it's important (in my humble opinion) to promote the heart of the issue: straight-up proficiency in handling a weapon. I could not cite you all the rules of English, but I know how to speak it. Likewise, I do not treat my firearms as loaded when they're not loaded, but this doesn't equal unsafe treatment. Begs the question, if they even exist, how should one treat an unloaded firearm? I would say: with equal respect and an equally sober mind as one would treat a loaded firearm.

Again, I understand the point of these rules for educational purposes, but I don't think they should be the end-all-be-all to proper firearm proficiency (and that word includes the safe operation thereof). That being said, I would never argue with you if I heard you cite that rule to a new shooter. Just on the DL, gun-nut to gun-nut, we should all know the truth. Simply reading the assembly manual ad infinitum doesn't get it built -- you have to actually build it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
24,058 Posts
My Granddad taught me something else too that has stuck with me all along. He was a Policeman and Chief of Police and told me never draw my gun unless I am going to shoot as there is no other option. No scaring or shock value, if I draw my gun, it will be shot. We do same thing in our competitions, gun is verified empty by RO then racked open and secured and then is considered safe. We cannot touch the gun at all until at the firing line. Also surprised how many shooters will holster the gun with the muzzle passing a body part (hand, arm, leg, etc). We do correct them and then watch to help reinforce the correct way. Absolutely no substitute for safety and diligence.
 

· Registered
Northwest Oregon
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
Well-intentioned rules to live by, but not always practical in real life. If you sit across from me, you are being muzzled by the condition one gun in my pocket. If you are on a floor below me, you are being muzzled by the condition one gun on my belt. If you are behind someone wearing a horizontal shoulder-holster, you are being muzzled. If you walk into an LGS, there are usually many handguns in the display cases muzzling you.

You would never test the trigger pull on a loaded gun. You would never dry-fire a loaded gun. You would never clean or gunsmith a loaded gun. There are always "Ya Buts" to hard and fast rules. Treat it as loaded until proven otherwise.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
3,222 Posts
If I am handed a firearm I check to see if it is loaded. NO EXCEPTIONS, EVER.
That's been my policy too, and it paid off one day in a big way.

A co-worker was given a rifle by a relative's wife, he asked if I'd take a look at it after work and see if I could tell him what he had been given.

So I followed him home, we go into his bedroom whereupon he retrieves a soft (non-locking) rifle case from under his bed. He took it out of the case and handed it to me, I started to work the bolt to check if it was loaded, he says "that's OK, it's not loaded"... you guys can probably guess what happens next.

I worked the bolt anyway and out pops a chambered live round, much to his surprise and horror, my co-worker was married with a young child in the house.

That happened 45 years ago and it has never left my mind, and every time I pick up a firearm, it's as if I'm back in 1975 with my inner voice saying "check it".
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top