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Discussion Starter #1
This has me buffaloed and I sure hope someone will help. With the cylinder closed the ejector rod does not match up with the lug under the barrel straight on when it is closed. (1/16th short of matching) I have spun the cylinder and am not able to observe any wobble of the ejector rod. Looking down the top strap at junction with the barrel, I may be able to see a very slight indication of the barrel being overtightened but am not sure from naked eye inspection. (Could be imagination) Of course, this barrel is pinned and I am not aware if the hole for the pin is pre-drilled before installation or drilled after barrel is installed. This is a 1953 era gun, don't think Smith will even give it a look. Anyone suggest a way to confirm the actual reason for this match-up problem? Appreciate all suggestions and/or reasons.
 

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The ejector rod must connect with the forward lug. It's a lock up point. Maybe the yoke is sprung?
Does it open and close easily?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes Sir, 500, nothing seems unusual in the opening and closing of the cylinder. Just see the almost straight line at the lug and ejector rod junction. I just examined it again and the measurement I quoted last night is not correct, more like a 1/64". Just not perfect. If I could not see the miss-match I would not even suspect a problem. Thanks for your interest.
 

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.22M.R.F.
My money's with 500 Magnum Nut.
An overtightened pinned barrel would involve way too many 'issues' that just aren't going to happen...
Clearance between the forcing cone and the cylinder, etc., etc.
I'm not a betting man (hate to lose money), but it certainly sounds like a sprung yoke to me.
It is fixable.
How does it get sprung?
Generally, by repeated 'flipping' the cylinder closed.
Don
;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
DHENRY, you know I appreciate your input, you may be correct in your evaluation of the problem. I can not confirm of deny that abuse has taken place, although I would be very disappointed to learn of same. This old piece has just become part of my family and with exception of this apparent problem, seems to be close to unused and very nice, faint turn line on cylinder. If I understand the apparent problem correctly, this could be compared to a bent frame on an automobile or am I mistaken? If this is the problem, can you advise the cure? Again, many thanks.
 

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If this is the problem, to check it, you need a alignment pin that slides thru the yoke which when closed, will fit into the hole in the breach face. If it's off they use a plastic wedge and bend the yoke around until it realigns as it should. The way they get bent is the hollywood way of snapping the cylinder closed. It causes undo stress on the yoke. Afterall the yoke is only a "pipe & bracket" which bends pretty easily. Always close the cylinder with your other hand by pressing it closed. No slapping it around. [-x
This is what the repair parts look like.
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ ... ENT%20TOOL
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ ... ON%20WEDGE
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the suggestions, you guys, I don't think many folks could diagnose a problem as you guys did. Although I hope you are wrong I certainly will have it checked out. (If it is bent it was pre Sam, only been part of this family less than a week and I do know better) Smith & Wesson will not check this out for me, will they? I do not own the referenced tools nor do I feel qualified to make repairs if I did. Again thanks. Sam.
 
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