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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Get a very small, short sight radius, moderately heavy long trigger pull semi-auto.....and attempt to shoot decent groups @ 7 yards at moderate but controlled speed!!! All of this combined will accentuate your shooting flaws! Ask me how I know! 😁

So, if you have access to a handgun similar to the aforementioned one......you should be able to diagnose your shortcomings as a shooter.

Today was my second brief outing with my Ruger LCP II in 22 RF. The first outing showed acquiring a good sight picture to be difficult .....yes, I have old eyes. Painting the front sight helped this issue. However, my groups ( a fairly loose term) were still low - left! Giving the rear sight some white paint really improved sight contrast, and reduced the group easily by 50%.

My initial thoughts on the low -left groups where simply that’s the way the sights align! However, I noticed that when shooting, I was positioning my finger pad near the tip of the finger. So, the next 10 shot group was with the index finger pad, centered on the trigger......now, we’re getting somewhere! Group was centered on the target point. 10 shots, in approximately 12 to 15 seconds in about a 4” group. Nope, not match worthy.....but, for the intended purpose for this little gun, all shots would have been center mass!

I never thought that shooting a handgun with almost everything working against the shooter, would help me discover my shooting flaws by magnifying them! memtb
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The vast majority of my handgun shooting during the past 2 years was with a 70+ ounce revolver, with a nice, light, crisp trigger, from a rest. That doesn’t promote good shooting technique! But, shooting this “little beast” really was an eye opener for me! 😁 memtb
 

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Take the attitude that you can shoot anything you pick up in your hand accurately. When you understand the small hand grip and trigger adjustments you can make, you can often improve accuracy of even a difficult handgun.

The fundamentals we teach in NRA Basic Pistol classes can help make you more accurate, regardless of how long you've been shooting. When you put down a handgun that doesn't fit your hands well, and pick up one that you really like - watch how much more accurate you can shoot...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Take the attitude that you can shoot anything you pick up in your hand accurately. When you understand the small hand grip and trigger adjustments you can make, you can often improve accuracy of even a difficult handgun.

The fundamentals we teach in NRA Basic Pistol classes can help make you more accurate, regardless of how long you've been shooting. When you put down a handgun that doesn't fit your hands well, and pick up one that you really like - watch how much more accurate you can shoot...

Kinda what I was getting at! The handgun was bought for pocket or ankle carry as a back-up where size/weight was the primary driving force. Not just assuming it was a handgun issue....I was “forced” to address “my” issues!

For those that do not have access to a trainer/instructor, through a concerted effort and thought process , may resolve their own problems. Meaning if someone has accuracy issues.....study your shooting mechanics! Adjusting your mechanics may fix that handgun that you were previously disappointed with! memtb
 

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It doesn't matter what I'm shooting, revolver, pistol, rifle or shotgun, the crease of my trigger finger naturally butts up to the right edge of the trigger and the pad of my index finger is what presses on the trigger surface. I don't adjust for it, don't think about it, it's just what God made me to do. To be honest, until reading this thread I've never given it any thought, but have tried it with samples of my limited arsenal, that's where my trigger finger goes. As for accuracy? When I was young I was scary good. Today, depending on what I've had for dinner the night before, then breakfast, the lighting, if I'm having to use an additional allergy medication, worry/stress level about family, the lunar cycle and of course, trying to see through eye-glasses with overlaying safety goggles, I can still safely hit the side of a large City Bus if it's stationary and I'm aiming at a tire! ;)
 

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Man, that is SO true! I transition from a stock Glock trigger to a nice 1911 or a tuned K frame, and it's just amazing how the struggle with a Glock trigger improves your focus and makes the "older, outdated guns" seem effortless.
 

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My trigger position shifts slightly from firearm to firearm. The key is that with a given grip, my trigger pull is straight back, and not to an angle. In teaching many years, I've learned that each individual has to find the right position and handhold. There are some basic principles, but beyond that observation by a good coach instructor and feedback one change at a time is quite useful. Many have seen this, but I'll post it again:

498964


This is a guide for right handed shooters. Flip it horizontally for left handed shooters.
 
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My trigger position shifts slightly from firearm to firearm. The key is that with a given grip, my trigger pull is straight back, and not to an angle. In teaching many years, I've learned that each individual has to find the right position and handhold. There are some basic principles, but beyond that observation by a good coach instructor and feedback one change at a time is quite useful. Many have seen this, but I'll post it again:

View attachment 498964

This is a guide for right handed shooters. Flip it horizontally for left handed shooters.
And as always, the one that I see most, even in long time shooters, is simple trigger jerk (impacting low left for RH shooters), or to coin it it speak of the 21st century; "less then optimal trigger control"...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
mrerick, Thanks for posting that guide. It should be very helpful to any and all shooters. I’ve actuall seen that many years ago, and actually remember it......which is what prompted me to modify my grip!

I’m going to copy, and enlarge it .....keeping it accessible for those rare times that I’m attempting to help another shooter. Or.......maybe help me when I’mm shooting poorly! memtb
 

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There are also some useful exercises. With dummy ammo (and always double check this) balance a nickle on the flat of the barrel near the front sight. Now operate the trigger single action without disturbing the nickle. Once you can do that consistently, operate the trigger in double action.

A ballistic pencil can provide you feedback in single action (only). Cock the gun, drop in a no 2. pencil up against the breech at the back of the cylinder, position the muzzle about 6 inches from a piece of paper with a target circle marked on the wall, aim at it, and then shoot the pencil up against the paper on the wall. Keep the graphite dots that result as close together as possible. They will always be slightly below center on the target bullseye marking - the the objective is to keep them close together. I use a pencil with the metal eraser mount covered by vinyl shrink tubing to prevent wear and ensure smooth travel.

Also, if you're anticipating recoil, have someone else load the cylinders with a combination of dummy and live rounds at the range. Make sure that person watches you shoot and knows what should be coming next (to ensure against misfires, squibs and delayed ignition). As you fire these combinations and come to a dummy round, recoil anticipation will be obvious.

When you teach and coach, there are a number of exercises in your bag of tricks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
mrerick, I used the #2 lead pencil/eraser method back in the 70’s, when trying to improved my shooting with my first Smith (a Model 28). I was impressed with the progress I made, absolutely free! In fact I tried to show the method to someone else, that after watching me make my little group.....thought that it was a stupid idea, because I was not hitting my target! 🥴 Yes......you can’t fix stupid! I realized that trying to teach the unteachable is an exercise in futility! 🤬

I’ve used method #3, numerous times over the years.....even on myself! Alternate indiscriminately, close my eyes, spin cylinder, close and fire a group.....I think of it as “target Russian Roulette”! memtb
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
mrerick.......I can’t even balance a nickel on a table top, on a handgun barrel....pretty unlikely! 😂 memtb
 

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OK... try a quarter... The top of the barrel (or slide on a semi-auto) has to be flat for this exercise...

If you like technology, the MantisX is a wonderful tool for improving grip, trigger control and shooting in general... You need a Picatinny rail on the frame or a magazine with a base you can sacrifice.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I think I can do it with a dime.....if you let me lay it down, flat to flat! 😉 memtb
 
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