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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I retired I had 5 managers, 4 supervisors and 3 consulting engineers reporting to me as part of my management team. One of those managers called me recently hoping I could answer a question for company lawyers as to when a particular microwave system was shut down because it had contract implications with multiple other utilities. I had the answer and he was happy for it! However, I’ve been thinking about work since then, only the good stuff (pre-management) and decided to look at some pictures. Here are a few that show the extreme contrast of Arizona, both are environments I once thrived in. There is one picture of guys from my old crew, the one on the far right, who had just retired from the Army than as a Ranger Sgt. Major, he’s the one who contacted me and is and has been in management for many years now, a very good man. Another picture taken atop a snow covered communications site, nearly every single one of those microwave dish antennas, I was the ‘top man’ on the tower, who pulled them into place and bolted them down. I have difficulty now kneeling down to clean the skimmer basket from my swimming pool…I clearly missed a chapter in the book of life because I wake up each morning wondering exactly what the heck has happened and how am I supposed to tie my shoe strings? :oops: Enjoy the pictures! ;)


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Know all bout that issue Stacy.... I have a helluva time tying my boot laces now. I attribute it to the chemo I got 2 years ago. It ruined my joints. I hurt all the time but what the heck, I'm alive...sort of.

Back when I was a young buck, I did high line and tree work and was nothing to be up high working. Thought nothing about it. Now, I get on a step ladder and I get wobbly. Still have my harness hanging in the garage, memories of a time past.

I've watched a couple you-Tube video's of communications technicians installing components on transmission towers way up high and I get queasy watching them.

Tough getting old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I hate to break the news to folks, that you don’t have to be 200’ in the air to be in danger. That same picture of my old crew, the man on the far left was once one of my best friends, he fell from a tower at the height of 22’, landed hard and tangled up in the tower foundation steel, busted up both legs and was expected to die, a dear friend. By then I was several levels removed from him in management, but still my responsibility, I rushed to the hospital, getting phone calls from the helicopter staff telling me they did NOT think he’d survive. Thankfully he did, but his life was totally destroyed, only able to semi-walk with walkers and canes, living with constant pain, he blamed our company, he eventually blamed me because I was their face, it broke my heart. I’m sorry for this personal burst of emotion, but only want to point out that simply getting on the roof of your house can be not only dangerous, but deadly were you to fall.
 

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Check this out
In violation of FAA Part 104, altitude drone height restriction. It's 400 feet above the surface. Still made me queasy.... :(
 
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