Smith And Wesson Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,975 Posts
Traditions makes a small diameter bore light that can be dropped into a muzzle loader. Traditions Bore Light

I really don't know if it is possible to remove the breech plug on a CVA. My old Numrich H&A Minuteman has a screw in breech plug. Haven't had it out in decades and it was a PIA last time I did it. And I clean my rifle after every shooting trip.

The CVA bolster does screw out. They are machined to turn up tight enough at the correct angle. It would be nice to be able to remove it, or at least the access screw.

If you really need to have the bolster off, try soaking the breech end of the barrel in a container of Ed's Red, which is equal parts of automatic transmission fluid, kerosene, mineral spirits and acetone. It had very good penetrations properties, does a good job of stopping and cleaning up existing rust, and helps to lubricate tight joints. A couple days soak is needed. Even auto tranny fluid alone will help, or Ballistol.
If you replace the nipple, try to get a stainless steel one.

Try running a snug, lubricated patch down the bore and "feel" for any roughness. That may help to evaluate the internal condition of you barrel. Use a paste type lube such as "Bore Butter". Crisco will do in a pinch.

At worse, I would expect there is some roughness inside the breech end of the bore. But those octagon barrels have a lot of extra meat on them. Doubt there is enough corrosion to be a safety issue. More likely it would be a hindrance to accuracy.

Black powder is best to use and really isn't that hard to clean up. Hot soapy water (dish soap liquid) does the trick and having an easily detachable barrel makes it a snap. just remember to clean the inside of the lock too! Most of the new substitutes require a thorough cleaning after use too. Pyrodex residue especially can be more corrosive than black powder's, despite the early claims.

My brother had a used TC Hawken that had been neglected worse than yours but it shot well enough to take hunting. He waffled on getting a new replacement barrel for years but eventually sold it to a friend that wasn't as picky!

Good luck with your new toy!

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,975 Posts
Thanks for the replies. One other question…what is that F (bullet point symbol) 2 stamped on the barrel? Is that telling me to use FFg/2Fg powder for that barrel? I’m just guessing here. I don’t know what that or the other two hallmark symbols stamped on the barrel are…
More likely an inspector mark.. I use 3Fg in my 45 caliber and smaller front stuffers and FFg in my 58 caliber and over guns. But you can use either in any of them. You may find that any particular gun shoots better groups with a certain granulation size. Even more so with different brands of Black powder. But start off by using what you can find and trying different load weights. For a 50 caliber start at 50 grains and work up in 5 grain increments and see what groups best. With black powder barrel length is a big influence on how much powder you use. For example, I have two 45 caliber rifles and I use the same .440" diameter round ball with a .010" greased patch in both. But my 28" barreled TC Hawken shoots best with 60 gr of FFFg while the 39" barreled H&A Minuteman does best with 90 grs of FFFg.
Whatever you use, just remember to remove the ramrod from the barrel before firing.

John
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top