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Discussion Starter #1
My father recently passed and left me several guns including this strange duck. It looks to me like a 1905 4th model, but the side plate has no S&W crest, there is only a “Made in USA” roll stamp on the right frame, the barrel has NO roll stamping whatsoever, and the cylinder says “ENGLAND” with several proof marks. Also, no ejector rod cover on the 2’ barrel, S&W grips with unmatching serial number, “P” stamped frame, and it chambers .38 Special.

Right side grip frame marked “K”, “8”, and indecipherable symbol. Left side marked “V”

Looks like a buffed and reblued job, with frame and cylinder serial numbers matching - 62790X...

I’m sorry, but for some reason I can’t upload pix directly from my iPad. I can try and use photobucket if needed.

Well, Whaddya think?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was able to upload to an album in my profile titled “Model 1905?”

Does that help, or should I try the Photobucket route?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks! I’ve always enjoyed my S&W pistols and revolvers, just never got on any forum until I had time. Retired now and making up for lost time!!! ��
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
That’s what I thought too. On closer exam, I can see where the lanyard loop stud is filled.

Any idea on date, I was thinking 1945. The revolver is sound, with excellent lockup and great rifling. Other than some finish scratches from a half-ass buffing job and a small amount of pitting, it’ll be a decent revolver for me.

Thanks,
John W.
 

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It will be a good revolver, they were built tough and reliable. The shortened barrel will surprise you at how accurate it can still be. Here’s my modified Victory similar to yours.

928E2E3F-CB79-4BF4-8F40-3935E637B029.jpeg

527BEA42-4F79-4503-A839-22BB9271C338.jpeg

96B62B74-E8B4-46D9-8E05-CAF6539D2F39.jpeg
 

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Welcome to the forum with a very nice old gun that should be a real shooter.
 

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I am not going to drag the book out on this one. Mid to latter 1944. I know of no BSR's that were SV serials. SV's largely fall in the 700K to 811K range. After that the commercial S range. Factory filled swivel holes are found in the high SV and low S ranges.

Unlike our friends Frankengun above, yours lacks two locking points. Colt's which rotate in the opposite direction pull into the frame. S&W's push away and since 1902 have had a forward lock. Also the oversize chambers may be a problem with swelled cases. If so use a punch from the front of the cylinder individually; do not bang on and bend the ejector rod.

Just saying...
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Thanks Waidman, good advice for sure! Before I run anything through it, I’m going to cerrocast a couple of the cylinder bores to make sure I’m not shooting undersized cartridges.

Also of interest to me is the later finding of hard to see proof marks on the bottom of the barrel listing 3 1/2 tons. One way or another, this old girl won’t be seeing any +P ammo...

Thanks again, I’ll watch for the signs of the S&W 38/200!

John W
 

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.38 .767 3 1/2 tons translates into caliber/case length/tested pressure or .38 S&W. The .38 Special would be .38 1.15 4 tons. These numbers reflect how it entered commerce in the U.K. not reflective of what happened here. If it chambers .38 Specials it has been converted. Its really not a safety issue at the service load level given about .004 inch difference. The cases will swell on the back end and either stick in the chambers or not. I would not shoot cheap aluminum case ammo which will swell like all get-out. S&W addresses this in their factory letters and simply says no +P ammo with the chamber conversion.

You can always pay through the nose and shoot under powered and undersized .38 S&W ammo in it. Ammo built to be safe in great grandma's top-break black powder era pea shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
.38 .767 3 1/2 tons translates into caliber/case length/tested pressure or .38 S&W. The .38 Special would be .38 1.15 4 tons. These numbers reflect how it entered commerce in the U.K. not reflective of what happened here. If it chambers .38 Specials it has been converted. Its really not a safety issue at the service load level given about .004 inch difference. The cases will swell on the back end and either stick in the chambers or not. I would not shoot cheap aluminum case ammo which will swell like all get-out. S&W addresses this in their factory letters and simply says no +P ammo with the chamber conversion.

You can always pay through the nose and shoot under powered and undersized .38 S&W ammo in it. Ammo built to be safe in great grandma's top-break black powder era pea shooter.
Yeah, I’ve got a handful of Iver Johnson and US Firearms top breaks in .38 S&W that I shoot the underpowered stuff out of just for fun. Most of my collection requires either black powder or downloaded reloads to shoot, so I’m pretty familiar with underpowered rounds!:p

Thanks for the expanded info on the British proofmarks, always learn something new when I get together with knowledgable folks!

John W
 
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