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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Greetings all! Been away for awhile as my last email was hacked by some losers, so I have returned with my usual nearly impossible to answer post, but hopefully SOMEONE out there may at least have an idea on this. I have a Model 11 Hog Hunter from Savage Arms chambered in .223 Rem. This rifle is a bolt action and has a 20" barrel with a 1X9 twist rate. I am loading 52 grain Sierra HPBT on "mutt" brass and plan on using Hogdon's Benchmark as the juice. I have taken several readings with the Hornady OAL guage and have a OAL of 2.020" measured at the Ogive using a comparator. If you are still awake, I would like to know how much "jump" to the rifling should I use for best accuracy at 100 yards? I would like to start with .20 since that would give me a nice even number to set up my Lee seating die to. Does anyone have any recommendations for this load and this gun regarding the jump? Thanks very much for any advice.
 

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On my Savage Model 12 with a 9 twist, I found most of the bullets preferred .010 off the rifling. I got better accuracy with that barrel using the heavier bullets like 68gr or 69gr Lapuas. A couple of the Berger bullets I tried gave better groups with the bullets seated right up to the rifling. Problem is, of course seated so far out they won't feed in a magazine. But that's ok with my rifle as it's a single shot. My notes say I got very good results (sub moa) using the Hornady 60gr seated .015 off the lands.
 

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Every rifle due to slight differences in tooling will perform slightly different than any other rifle, including it's twin. Because of this, if you're trying to wring out every last drop of accuracy, you must experiment w/ every possible combination. Long range shooters have argued whether a bullet should seat in the rifling while in the chamber or have some freebore or how much freebore, etc. as long as they've been shooting. The correct answer varies w/ each rifle & must be worked out for each rifle. I no longer build custom rifles but each rifle gains a miniscule amount of accuracy w/ each improvement. This will either be great fun or frustration depending on your temperament. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
This will either be great fun or frustration depending on your temperament. Hope this helps.
With my temperment it will most likely be the latter, :D, thanks for all the input fellas. I really appreciate it. Sometimes the funnest part of working up a target load is all the tinkering....
 

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Every rifle due to slight differences in tooling will perform slightly different than any other rifle, including it's twin. Because of this, if you're trying to wring out every last drop of accuracy, you must experiment w/ every possible combination. Long range shooters have argued whether a bullet should seat in the rifling while in the chamber or have some freebore or how much freebore, etc. as long as they've been shooting. The correct answer varies w/ each rifle & must be worked out for each rifle. I no longer build custom rifles but each rifle gains a miniscule amount of accuracy w/ each improvement. This will either be great fun or frustration depending on your temperament. Hope this helps.
That is excellent advice from Injunbro. Most people don't go to that much trouble but it is an EXCELLENT way to learn your rifle and it's preferences and idiosyncrasies. I have the tools to measure the leade and headspace wear on my 308s and 30/06 rifles but only do so after several hundred rounds.



Once I develop a load that I really like, I pretty much stick with it. I also don't push my "accuracy rifles" by shooting a lot of rounds rapidly which causes heat build up and wears the throat out quickly.
 

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Barnes reccommends to start at .040. Obviously if you seat your bullets into the lands your pressures will go up. If you seat them too deeply you will lose potential accuracy. I have settled on .050 and if it works then I don't mess with it. I am more concerned that the bullet is seated at least the depth of it's diameter. I have a .284 that is built on a Remington short action. Because of that I cannot exceed 2.820 OAL so the jump to the rifling is what it is. The last group I shot with that rifle was .246". It is consistently a one holer with any quality bullet. I think your "mutt brass" will give you more trouble than your bullet seating depth. But thats what makes the process fun. The experimentation.
 

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Weatherby uses a long jump in their rifles (I suspect to reduce internal pressures). I like to start at .015 and find the most accurate load and then start playing with the OAL.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think your "mutt brass" will give you more trouble than your bullet seating depth. But thats what makes the process fun. The experimentation.
Agreed. I have since picked up 50 Nosler cases that have all the prep work pretty much done. Very shiny and pretty :D. Once I get some "fire-formed" brass I plan on using the Lee Collett neck-sizing die only, which is supposed to - in a perfect world - get me to within MOA at 100 yards. We shall see.....

Thanks again everyone for the input. Learn something every day on here....
 
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