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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple weeks ago Missus Fan was in the kitchen and she swore somebody drove by and shot at the house. I gave her my Pre15 Combat Masterpiece. I just looked at it and it has rust all over it.:eek:
I have read some of you have a substance that can get it off.
What is it?
Jim
 

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Several things will get it off. Blue Wonder cleaner will take the rust off but leave the blue. Soaking it in automatic transmission fluid then carding it with bronze wool will take it off. Kroil will take it off. And one last one that I just heard about is boiling it to convert the iron oxide to a rust blue. Might not want to do that last one if it has a red insert in the front sight.

Guy
 

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I don’t have an expert opinion, but you prompt me to go to the safe and inspect my own precious pre-15. Best of luck.
 
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Good luck indeed. May have to check out my guns.
 
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Be sure to catch any oxidation before it progresses to pitting.

I remove iron oxide rust using either well oiled 0000 steel or bronze wool on a well oiled blued surface.

This is not for stainless steel - just rust blued or salt blued surfaces.

Don't rub too hard. The iron oxide is softer than the bronze or steel wool, and the bluing (really a different phase of iron oxide called magnetite) is harder than bronze or steel wool.

Done correctly, you won'd damage the blued surface. Use too much force and you'll gall the steel under the bluing, which is a very thin layer.

Once iron oxide (The FE3O4 phase which is red in color) gets started, the surface will end up pitted if the rust isn't removed. When complete, just oil the gun with Rem Oil or another preserving gun oil.
 

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The kitchen and bathroom are the most humid parts of a house. BreakFree works well for me as a preservative.
 

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I use Solvol Autosol, cleans them right up. No blue damage.

thewelshm
 
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As Wiregrass Guy suggested, Blue Wonder is probably the fastest way to remove it. Kroil and ATF treatments take longer to work, so if you intend to get the revolver back into action quickly, I'd go that route. As has also been noted, don't sit on it, if pitting sets in, you won't be able to reverse that without major restorative work.
 

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Flitz is an abrasive albeit a fine one.. I'd go the ATF+ bronze wool route first.
 

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I think that the first reaction we have to seeing rust on our precious firearms is emotional. Like most upsetting things, there is both an emotional and rational side to dealing with it. In many ways it's like the balance between emotional reaction and practical steps to dealing with disease (like Corona virus) - and once things have been politicized all rational though takes a back seat...

Rust removal is really a contest of hardness of materials.... hard things cut softer things.

The key is that you want an abrasive that is softer than magnetite (the Fe3O4 phase of iron oxide) and harder than rust (the Fe2O3 phase of iron oxide) AND softer than the steel that is under the magnetite.

The abrasive in many metal polishes will cut right through the magnetite and into the steel itself.

Bronze in bronze wool is softer than steel and magnetite, and steel wool is a softer alloy of steel (but much closer in hardness).

I sometimes use Simichrome polish (a fine abrasive based polish) on stainless steel - especially to gently remove the carbon buildup on the front of a cylinder in a Stainless Steel revolver.... but ONLY a Stainless Steel surface.

Some of these principles are discussed in articles about Rockwell Hardness measurement and cutting tools.

Remember that the steel in handguns is often hardened during the manufacturing cycle after forging, cutting, polishing and fitting.


 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Got a shipment of Flitz today. I applied it to the Combat Masterpiece and it took almost all of the rust off on the first try.:cool:
I also noticed my old Ruger Standard model had quite a bit of rust on it. It was in my dresser drawer next to my Heavy Duty which had none on it. The Flitz didn't remove all the rust from the Ruger but I'm gonna keep trying.
Thanks for the help!:)
Jim
 
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