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As mentioned, it probably is a model 10 S&W Revolver. The grips are unusual, and very likely aftermarket. Your grandfather may have saved the original grips somewhere, so do take a look for them.

Serial number and the -x dash level will help determine when it was made.

Welcome to the forum.
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum. The -6 is the 6th version of the firearm. This is done with a firearm currently in production that has any type of change to improve the function. Great inheritance and one to cherish, enjoy and pass on.:cool:
 

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Every time Smith and Wesson makes engineering changes to the model numbered revolvers, they get a new dash suffix number.

it puts the revolver into a time period, but the serial is needed for anything close to the actual manufacture date.

The aftermarket grips may be nice, but they negatively impact the value of the revolver, so do try and find the originals. Could be in a workshop... a drawer... any number of places.
 

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Thanks all for the comment.
As checked, it shown as 10-6 on the cylinder.

So what doest in mean ? Lol
It means the gun isn't really that old. S&W made, literally, millions of them. Depending on who made the target stocks, they may be worth more than the gun. Considerably more.
 

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Very nice inheritance. The grips look like aftermarket grips possibly for target shooting. The model 10 is a very accurate gun and should put the bullet wherever you want it. Enjoy and hopefully good memories
 

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Personally I would take off those grips and lose them in a drawer and put on a set of Pachs or whatever normal looking grips I could find--They are UGLY!
 

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The aftermarket grips may be nice, but they negatively impact the value of the revolver
Not to me! They're the best thing about it, in my opinion. How many late-model 10s are on the market at any given time? Anybody looking to buy one is going to have PLENTY of choices! Of course, it's better to have the originals also, if they can be found, but if they can't, the present owner needn't be too upset about it.
 

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Interesting to note how much attention those grips are getting......and varying opinions too. My personal opinion is, If you like them and like shooting with them then use them (but take good care of them because they may be valuable). That type of grip is usually used on target guns, which a Model 10 is not (indeed is is an accurate handgun)......however as the old saying goes, "different strokes for different folks" certainly holds true. If it were my Model 10, I'd put some rubber grips on it because they feel comfortable when shooting (truth be told, many folks consider them ugly but not many people say negative things about how rubbers feel and/or shoot).

BTW as has already been mentioned, depending upon who made those target grips, they could be quite valuable by themselves.......and if you don't have any sentimental attachment to them I'll just betcha they would be easily sold (they will fit a number of K-Frame S&W's).

Anyway, you have a priceless heirloom (to your family) that you can shoot for the rest of your life and then pass it on to the next generation (provided it's not abused and it is cared for properly).

Regards,

Geezer
 

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Sweet looking gun! Unique grips, look to be well made! As mentioned, depending who made them, could be valuable.

The serial number of the gun should be right there under the yoke where you saw the 10-6 (it's called the yoke, the piece that swings out). That (xx-out the last couple of digits if you're sensitive about giving out the whole serial) will give us more to go on regarding when it was shipped from the factory. By the time the 10-6 was being made, I believe S&W had gone to an alpha-numeric format, and the next gun out got the next serial, so the previous gun out the door may have had the immediate previous serial but been a completely different model, even a semi-auto. But those serials were issued in a pretty constrained time frame.

Nothing inaccurate about the Model 10. It's predecessor, before Smith started assigning model numbers in 1957-58, was called the M&P Hand Ejector. General Patton, before he was a General, competed with an M&P in the Olympic Games. While others were shooting .22s, he was shooting a .38 Special. He lost the Gold due to one round going through another hole so precisely they called it a miss. Today they have a separate sheet of paper behind the target, a fresh sheet for each round fired, to prevent such a miss-call from happening again. The heritage of your gun forms the major backbone of the Smith & Wesson revolver lineup.
 
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